New, Revised, or Experimental Courses

ART 333 01 Advanced Topics In Studio Art :
EXPERIMENTAL MEDIA II
4 This course recognizes that the digital landscape is continually growing and changing, and that artists thrive in this environment by constantly discovering new forms through hybrid combinations of media and ideas. Students in this studio intensive course will be asked to develop projects that incorporate this mode of experimentation. Specifically, we will examine experimental approaches to image and video capture (lens alterations, underwater capture, aerial footage etc.), hybrid methods of image manipulation (combining multiple software, still, time-based, analog and digital platforms) and alternative export including digital print and image transfer on non-traditional materials (metal, fabric, canvas, and other materials). This is a studio art course, which also includes a high degree of research and writing. Prerequisite: ART 214 or permission from the instructor.
ARTH250 01 Topics Art History :
LATIN AMER. ART & ARCHITECTURE
4 This class is a selective introduction to the art and architecture of the Americas from the earliest civilizations to the present. The course surveys a diverse range of visual culture from ancient Mesoamerica and the Andes through the Colonial, post-Independence, Modern and Contemporary periods. The course provides a basic understanding of the history of artistic production and intercultural interaction through the study of representative works of art and architecture from each period and region. Analysis takes an interdisciplinary approach to examine the continuities and changes in the form, function, and symbolism of Latin American art and architecture over time. Particular focus is on the role of visual media in the construction and maintenance of political power, religious belief and practice, concepts of space and place, national identity, socioeconomic organization and self-representation in Latin America. No pre-requisite. This course satisfies the core curriculum requirement in Arts.
ARTH331 01 Latin Amer Art Of 20Th Century :
ART AND REVOLUTION
4 This team-taught course explores the historic events and artistic movements of the Mexican Revolution of 1910 and Cuban Revolution of 1959. The primary focus is the active role of visual culture in the construction and advancement of revolutionary politics and new national identities. The course moves chronologically, starting with the history of artistic production and political activism before the Revolutions, and ends examining the successes and failures of these two nations as they struggled to overthrow aristocratic societies and dictatorial regimes. Students will investigate Revolutionary history and visual culture across a variety of media including painting, graphic art, sculpture, performance, photography and film. We will consider individuals, organizations and artists that were protagonists or antagonists in these movements to examine the tenuous relationship between public policy, national identity and artistic production. Through written assignments, oral presentations and creative projects, students will develop and hone skills in the formal and contextual analysis of visual media, the assessment of primary documents, and critical thinking across the disciplines of art history and history. Co-taught with HIST 394. Prerequisite is one of the following: ARTH 100, one 200-level ARTH course, or consent of instructor.
ASIA210 01 East Asian Martial Arts Films :
4 How did martial arts grow into a popular genre in fiction and film, and how did the genre become a worldwide craze? How do martial arts movies comment on East Asian and North American cultures? The course examines the formation of literary and cinematic conventions of martial arts films, the history of their production in countries such as China, Hong Kong and Japan, and their ideological background. In addition to offering an introduction to filmic technique and Asian popular media, the course dwells on the importance of visual and bodily perception, gender constructions, and intercultural translation.
BIOL380 01 Topics In Biology :
4 This course is an overview or introduction of statistical methods applied to biology and builds on the basic statistics taught very generally in the four core courses of the biology curriculum. After an introduction to data, probability, and sampling distributions, statistical inference and hypothesis testing will be covered. We will examine a variety of statistical tests, including one- and two-sample tests, correlation and regression analyses, multinomial tests, analysis of variance, and nonparametric tests. Among the natural sciences, biological data can present particular challenges, such as a high amount of variability, as well as spatial and temporal correlation problems. We will discuss how to identify and mitigate these issues. Students should be prepared to work independently and in small groups on assignments and homework. Students will learn to use SPSS for performing statistical analyses and how to apply what the statistics they learn in this course to their own research projects. Lecture and lab. Prerequisite: BIOL271and BIOL271L, or permission of instructor.
BIOL380 03 Topics In Biology :
4 In this course, we will examine one of the major changes ecosystems currently face: invasive species. Primarily focused on plants, this field course emphasizes the ecology of emerging and established invasion problems. We will investigate what invasions can teach us about fundamental ecological processes, as well as how to approach real-world invasion problems from an applied perspective. Topics covered include: characteristics of invasive species, mechanisms of invasion, interactions between invaders and other species, evolution of invasive species, impacts of invasives on ecosystem functioning and the management of invasions. Lecture, laboratory, and field experiences (one overnight trip). Prerequisite: BIOL271and BIOL271L, or permission of instructor.
CORE101 01 First Year Seminar :
Pimp My Ride:Materialism
4 The unprecedented scale of contemporary materialism and consumption raises disquieting questions about wealth and poverty, character and equality, and collective and individual identities built on ethnicity, class, and gender. This seminar will address complex issues of materialism and consumption—through space and time—to reveal cultural, political, and ethical consequences. Students will explore a brief history of early Western attitudes towards commerce and consumption that continues to influence thinking today, an overview of the many and diverse claims and critiques of capitalism and consumption, and a synthesis and analysis of materialism and cross-cultural consumption practices from a contemporary context. Why *do* we wear our bling on our sleeves? Do the things we make and own, make and own us? The lamentation of materialism and its minion conspicuous consumption is loud indeed—but is it all bad?
CORE101 16 First Year Seminar :
From Jupiter to Jesus
4 Course Description and Goals: This is a First Year Seminar which seeks to introduce students to stimulating scholarly work while enhancing the student’s own academic skills. Roman religion focused on the proper procedures for pleasing the ancient gods to ensure positive outcomes in warfare, agriculture, health, and romance. Chief of the Roman gods was Jupiter or Zeus, the “father of gods and men.” We will examine not only Roman beliefs about the power of the pagan gods and goddesses but also focus on the role of priests and priestesses in performing correct rituals. We will examine the rise of Christianity with its focus on Jesus as the son of God and study how the new religion gradually replaced the old practices and beliefs. Close study of ancient evidence will enable you to examine these issues in depth from an historical vantage point. Thus, by the end of this course, you should be able to: • recognize some of the major themes of Roman religious belief and practice and understand how and why polytheism was replaced by monotheism. • use a variety of critical thinking methods in interacting with a topic, question, or group of texts • use information literacy to find, evaluate, and incorporate diverse kinds of information into your existing knowledge base. • use effective written expression strategies to organize ideas, develop a thesis, revise and edit informal and formal texts for appropriate audiences. • use effective oral expression strategies and model civility of discourse in the context of small group activities, large group discussions, and formal presentations. • reflectively participate in a dynamic academic and social environment as a member of the college community.
CORE101 20 First Year Seminar :
Math,Music and the Mind
4 Did you know that Bach used algebraic principles to compose music? That your ear performs sophisticated mathematics (a Fourier Transform) before passing auditory information to your brain? That your brain frequently tricks you into hearing sounds that aren’t there? These are many of the questions that lie at the intersection of math, music and the mind. Our explorations will help you understand the seemingly simple sound of a vibrating string, the full sound of a symphony orchestra, and even the voice of a loved one on the other end of the phone. We will explore an array of topics: vibrating strings and pitch, why a piano is never in tune, auditory illusions that trick the mind, how number theory explains complex rhythms, why some songs stick in your head, and avant garde attempts to apply the principles of probability to music. You will have the opportunity to apply this new knowledge in myriad ways, from simple mathematical assignments, to elementary compositions (the ability to read music is assumed), to the mathematical analysis of your favorite music. By the end of this course, you will hear and appreciate the world around you in entirely new ways.
ECON459 01 Seminar In Economics :
Radical Perspectives on Economy
4 Various schools of economic thought have challenged and continue to seek alternatives to the mainstream economic theory, neoclassical economics; this course is an introduction to contemporary heterodox economic theories. Classified under the broad term, political economy, these theories construe “the economy” differently, illuminating much that neoclassical economics leaves in the dark. This course will acknowledge the existence both of different theories of political economy and of numerous ways of understanding those differences, thus, celebrating the pluralism of heterodox economic discourses. There are three parts to this course. Part I is an introduction to some of the basic themes of the course, which highlights the significant differences between political economy and mainstream economics. After discussing the premises and promises of neoclassical economics, we will register the recent “criticisms from within” as articulated by the post-autistic economics movement. Part II covers the basic concepts and methods of the various “schools” of contemporary political economy: Marxian, post-Keynesian, radical, institutionalist, Austrian, feminist, environmental, and postcolonial. Finally, in Part III we will discuss the different consequences of these theories by examining some specific issues and themes such as economic justice, income inequality, globalization, and alternatives to capitalism.
ENGL130 01 Literary Topics :
READING NATURE
4 Whoever you are, wherever you live, what is most important in life connects in some way to your relationship with land, water and air; it is the integration of your inner with your outer world. A good way to understand ourselves, therefore, can come from reading about the ecologies to which we belong. For that reason, this course will explore both nature and nature writing. One goal is to use our readings to think about our individual and collective relationship with our environment, and to that end, we will read essays by authors including Henry David Thoreau and Annie Dillard, poetry by authors including Mary Oliver and N. Scott Momaday, and fiction by authors including Ursula K. Le Guin and Raymond Carver. We will use these works also to think critically about nature and modern civilization and about how our literary tradition has contributed to our exchange of ideas. This course satisfies the Core Curric¬ulum requirement in the Arts. This course counts for credit in ENST. Prerequisite: ENGL102, CORE101, NITZ180, or CORE301.
ENGL204 01 Reading/Writing In The Major :
4 The goal of ENGL 204 is to teach students reading and writing skills particular to literary study, to enable them to better manage the historical and topical content of 200 & 300-level literature classes. In this course: (1) Students will hone and refine their ability to do close readings of both primary and secondary texts. (2) They will learn to identify formal elements that contribute to a text’s meaning (such as symbolism, meter, etc.). (3) In order to write better literary analyses, they will learn to pose questions about a text that are both worth asking, and also answerable in the time they have allotted. (4) They will learn to formulate a literary argument; to support their argument with evidence from their reading of a primary text (and secondary texts, if appropriate); and to revise their work in response to critiques. This course satisfies the Core Curric¬ulum requirement in the Arts. Prerequisite: ENGL102, CORE101, NITZ180, or CORE301.
ENGL235 01 Topics Literature And Culture :
SLAVE NARRATIVES
4 In this course, we will explore representations of American slavery. We will begin with the slave narratives of the antebellum era, focusing on well-known accounts by former slaves like Harriet Jacobs and Frederick Douglass. We will then consider both novels and short stories about the slave system written from a variety of perspectives, both before and after the Civil War. The final section of the course will take up more recent novels that focus on slavery. Throughout, we will attend to how these works reflect and challenge cultural assumptions about race, while also providing a space for American writers to work out conflicted ideas about the history of slavery in the United States and its impact on how we understand “American” ideals like freedom and liberty. Course readings may include works by Jacobs, Douglass, William Wells Brown, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Charles Chesnutt, Joel Chandler Harris, Toni Morrison, Edward P. Jones, and Sherley Anne Williams. This course satisfies the Core Curriculum requirement in Cultural Perspectives. This course counts for credit in the Africa/African-Diaspora Studies Program. Prerequisite: ENGL102, CORE101, NITZ180, or CORE301.
ENGL355 01 Studies In British Literature :
"WE OTHER VICTORIANS"
4 British literature during Queen Victoria’s reign represents a fascinating period in the development of what we now term “popular culture.” London’s Crystal Palace served as a symbol of middle-class consumerism; modern-day advertising was born; photographs became metonyms for personal and national identities; the serialization of the novel enticed middle- and working-class audiences to become avid readers; and technologies like the steam engine and the telegraph allowed for mass production and distribution of goods, including printed texts. In this course, we will explore interconnections between Victorian literature and culture by examining the treatment of some of the major issues of the time: science and evolution, industrialization and commercialism, women’s rights and domesticity, race and empire, fashion and image, as well as aesthetics and criticism. We will simultaneously discuss our modern-day views of the Victorians through the medium of our own popular culture, examining excerpts from such texts as contemporary films and novels about the Victorian period. By the end of the term, it is my hope that you will re-see our own world through the Victorian imagination, coming to understand what Foucault meant when he said that we are Other Victorians. Novels will include works such as Hard Times, Jane Eyre, Vanity Fair, Alice in Wonderland, Daniel Deronda, The Picture of Dorian Gray, Wide Sargasso Sea, and The French Lieutenant’s Woman. We will also read poetry by such authors as Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Robert Browning, Alfred, Lord Tennyson, and Christina Rossetti as well as polemics by Charles Darwin, John Stuart Mill, John Ruskin, Matthew Arnold, and/or Oscar Wilde. In addition, we will simultaneously survey cultural texts such as advertisements, puffs, reviews, cartoons, paintings, and personal letters as well as consumer goods such as clothing, furniture, and wallpaper—and we will watch at least one modern-day film. Prerequisite: ENGL281, 282, 283, or permission of the instructor. Recommended: ENGL281 (for topics before 1700), ENGL282 (for topics after 1800), or ENGL283 (for topics after 1900).
ENGL365 01 Studies In American Literature :
AMERICAN REALISM
4 In his late nineteenth-century text Criticism and Fiction, WD Howells argued that American literature should “portray men and women as they are, actuated by the passions and motives in the measure we all know.” This course will examine how writers after the Civil War responded to Howells’ mandate by telling stories about American citizens “as they are.” Of course, as we will discover, this mandate is deceptively simple, and the second half of the nineteenth century could be characterized as a time in American literature when writers struggled with the complexities of this project. Which “men and women,” they asked, are worthy subjects of these stories? Do “we … all know” the same things about these men and women? How do we tell these stories? Furthermore, how do we tell stories about men and women we don’t know? What are the "passions and motives" appropriate for literary texts? How do changes in American culture and politics (Reconstruction, The Gilded Age, progressivism, industrialization, modern capitalism, the rise of consumer culture) affect these men and women and our ability to tell stories about them? In short, this class explores how all of these authors are working through questions of what it means to be an American and how literature should talk about that American. As we explore these questions, we will examine short stories, essays, and novels by authors such as Howells, Mark Twain, Henry James, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Sarah Orne Jewett, Joel Chandler Harris, Edith Wharton, Charles Chesnutt, Paul Laurence Dunbar, Theodore Dreiser, Frank Norris, Booker T. Washington, and W.E.B. Du Bois. Prerequisite: ENGL281, 282, 283, or permission of the instructor. Recommended: ENGL281 (for topics before 1700), ENGL282 (for topics after 1800), or ENGL283 (for topics after 1900).
ENGL365 02 Studies In American Literature :
GOTHIC LITERATURE
4 From its beginnings, the literature of the United States has been marked by its reliance on conventions we might identify as gothic: haunted houses, unexplained events, unhinged minds, and the like. In this class, we will address how the gothic tendencies of American literature have attempted to question national ideals of freedom, reason, and progress by destabilizing the categories of nation, history, home, and personhood. Students should expect to the bulk of our coursework to focus on the nineteenth century. Syllabus may include works by Charles Brockden Brown, Edgar Allan Poe, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Louisa May Alcott, Henry James, Ambrose Bierce, Edith Wharton, and Charlotte Perkins Gilman. Prerequisite: ENGL281, 282, 283, or permission of the instructor. Recommended: ENGL281 (for topics before 1700), ENGL282 (for topics after 1800), or ENGL283 (for topics after 1900).
ENGL365 03 Studies In American Literature :
AMER.PLAYS/PLAYWRIGHTS:1945-PRES
4 In this course we will study the works of a dozen playwrights who have variously posed some of the most defining, provocative, and persistent questions about American culture and experience. While much of our discussion will focus on these plays as beautifully crafted literary texts that reflect the historical, political, and artistic landscapes in which they were written and received, we will constantly keep in mind how issues of performance and theatricality are indispensible to understanding them. With this in mind, we will frequently view clips from film adaptations of the plays and attend one or two live productions in Washington, D.C. as a way of appreciating how plays live ultimately not on the page but on the stage (and screen). You will also have the opportunity in groups to research and work on enacting a particular scene from one of the plays with the goal of deepening even further your experience of the ways in which the language of a play depends on performance to make its meaning complete. Plays may include the following: Eugene O’Neill, Long Day’s Journey into Night; Tennessee Williams, A Streetcar Named Desire; Arthur Miller, Death of a Salesman; Lorraine Hansberry, A Raisin in the Sun; Edward Albee, Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?; Marsha Norman, Getting Out ; Sam Shepard, True West; David Mamet, Glengarry Glen Ross; David Henry Hwang, M Butterfly; Tony Kushner, Angels in America: A Gay Fantasia on National Themes: Part One: Millennium Approaches; Margaret Edson, W;t; John Patrick Shanley, Doubt: A Parable; David Henry Hwang, Yellow Face; Bruce Norris, Clybourne Park. Prerequisite: ENGL281, 282, 283, or permission of the instructor. Recommended: ENGL281 (for topics before 1700), ENGL282 (for topics after 1800), or ENGL283 (for topics after 1900).
ENGL395 01 Topics In Writing :
CREATIVE NON-FICTION
4 Creative nonfiction, as its name suggests, is both "creative" and "nonfictive." Creative nonfiction enacts an imaginative engagement with the real: it combines the shaping presence of the imagination with a deep and honest exploration of factuality. The imaginative element demands a strong and consistent point of view, as in all first-person prose. But in its factual dimension, creative nonfiction goes beyond memoir in order to make a point, convey knowledge, and/or deliver an insight. This workshop offers extensive study of and practice in the genre. Prerequisites: One 200-level writing course or permission of the instructor.
ENGL410 01 Studies In Authors :
FAULKNER, CATHER, HURSTON
4 Created by a people from their land and tales, regional literature evokes visions both geographical and human. While the land is never separate from the story, questions arise as to source, mode, and inspiration. Willa Cather claims that “The history of every country begins in the heart of a man or a woman,” while William Faulkner laments the futility of chronicling a people and a land, asserting that “two hundred years had not been enough.” Zora Neale Hurston dramatizes more than philosophizes. Hurston’s more direct approach and emphasis on characters’ voices brings into consideration narrative style in the construction of regional qualities. Focusing on the interplay of natural history and social history, this course will begin with these authors’ short stories and progress to longer fiction. Novels will include Cather’s O Pioneers! and My Antonia, Faulkner’s Go Down, Moses and The Sound and the Fury, and Hurston’s Jonah’s Gourd Vine and Their Eyes Were Watching God. As a 400-level seminar, students should be prepared to encounter criticism and theory in their readings and incorporate them into writings and discussions. If they have not done so already, students are encouraged to take ENGL 283 concurrently with this course. Prerequisites: ENGL 304 and one 300-level literature course or permission of the instructor.
ENGL410 02 Studies In Authors :
THE GODWINS AND THE SHELLEYS
4 In this course, we’ll read the work of a family of writers—-William Godwin, his wife Mary Wollstonecraft, their son-in-law Percy Shelley, and their daughter Mary Shelley--who collectively wrote about most of the major philosophical and political concepts developed during the Romantic revolution (1790 1830+). In fact, these authors are responsible for originating many of these concepts, which changed western thought and still provide many of the assumptions, overt and otherwise, that underlie our culture. Readings will include Godwin’s political-gothic novel Caleb Williams, Mary Wollstonecraft’s A Vindication of the Rights of Women, Percy Bysshe Shelley’s philosophical poems, and Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein (which is more complex and interesting when read as the sum of her family’s influences). Other readings will include literary-critical essays, especially of Frankenstein. ENGL282 (Literature in History II) is strongly recommended before taking this course; interested nonmajors should have some background in Romantic literature or 18thc philosophy. Prerequisites: English 304 and one English 300-level literature course or permission of the instructor, and the ability to spell "Wollstonecraft." English 282 highly recommended. Interested non-majors should have some background in Romantic literature or 18th-c philosophy.
ENGL410 03 Studies In Authors :
TALES OF GENJI
4 A semester-long look at The Tale of Genji, the cornerstone of Japanese literature composed by a court woman named Murasaki Shikibu in the eleventh century. Known (inappropriately but understandably) as the world’s first novel, the work employs the changing seasons as a metaphor for human destiny and expresses better than any work of literature the Japanese feeling for the inter-relationship of human life, art, and nature. Readings will include selected works influenced by the tale from the fifteenth through the twentieth centuries. The course counts for credit in Asian Studies. Prerequisites: ENGL 304 and one 300-level literature course or permission of the instructor.
HIST394 01 Top:Asian,African,Lat Am Hist :
Chinese Cinema
4 This course explores the development of Chinese cinema within the context of the rapid changes that took place in China throughout the twentieth century and into the twenty-first. It traces early productions, particularly in Shanghai in the 1930s, socialist films of the Maoist era, as well as post-socialist films of the reform era. Themes explored include representations of gender, minorities, and how national identities and historical memory are constructed
HIST394 02 Top:Asian,African,Lat Am Hist :
Art & Rev. in Latin America
4 This team-taught course explores the historic events and artistic movements of the Mexican Revolution of 1910 and Cuban Revolution of 1959. The primary focus is the active role of visual culture in the construction and advancement of revolutionary politics and new national identities. The course moves chronologically, starting with the history of artistic production and political activism before the Revolutions, and ends examining the successes and failures of these two nations as they struggled to overthrow aristocratic societies and dictatorial regimes. Students will investigate Revolutionary history and visual culture across a variety of media including painting, graphic art, sculpture, performance, photography and film. We will consider individuals, organizations and artists that were protagonists or antagonists in these movements to examine the tenuous relationship between public policy, national identity and artistic production. Through written assignments, oral presentations and creative projects, students will develop and hone skills in the formal and contextual analysis of visual media, the assessment of primary documents, and critical thinking across the disciplines of art history and history.
HIST430 01 Maryland Research Seminar :
4 This course takes advantage of the college’s location and relationships with nearby historical institutions to explore the major interpretive debates, theoretical frameworks, and research methods related to early American history (pre-1860). During the first half of the course, students will take field trips, converse with representatives of local history organizations, and read widely in the published literature in order to devise individual research projects that will specifically pertain to a local historical institution and its immediate interpretive and/or programmatic goals. Students will have great flexibility in the form of their project, though some written material will be mandatory. Although the course readings and most project options will focus on the colonial Chesapeake, students will be exposed to interdisciplinary, comparative, and integrative approaches that encourage thinking beyond this region or even the British Empire. The second half of the semester focuses on the execution of these research projects, requiring a written prospectus, a progress report/rough draft, and a final product which will be presented at and/or deposited with the institution.
HIST435 01 Topics:European History :
Law & Society in Ancient World
4 This course will analyze and compare the concepts of justice and equity that underlay the legal systems of ancient Mesopotamia, Greece, and Rome. The intersections of responsibility and right conduct between superior and inferior or between equals will be of particular interest. The relations between master and slave, between husband and wife, and between buyer and seller offered the potential for conflict among interested parties. The ancient legal arrangements, as set forth in both the ancient legal texts and recorded trials (particularly murder cases), reveal shifting paradigms of right and wrong behavior and shed light on current interpretations of justice and equity.
HIST435 02 Topics:European History :
Revolution, Sex, and Absinthe
4 In the second half of the nineteenth century, France meant fashion, art, literature, fine food, wine, sex; in short, all that was stimulating, stylish, and modern. While Paris was the cultural capital of the world, the Revolutionary tradition of France and the increasingly complex international situation brought turbulence to its political, economic, and social realms as the century drew to a close, and a new one began. This course investigates French culture, society, and politics from the Second Empire to the eve of World War I.
HIST475 01 Top Comparative,Thematic,Global :
World War I
4 This course will survey the history of World War, understood broadly to include the origins and causes of the war, the central events of the conflict, as well as the effects and consequences of the war. The course will cover the European aspects of the war, but it will also consider its global ramifications, including the theaters of war in Africa, Asia and the Middle East, as well as the impact of the war on Latin America, and the global impact of the peace agreements that brought the war to a close.
ILCF363 01 Topics French Lit Ii :
4 French literature has generated numerous variations on the theme of deadly women. In its most benign form, la femme fatale is a semi-feral “wild child,” reckless but well intentioned, ruining the lives of men not by her explicit design but by her unchecked desire. Less innocent and decidedly urban versions of la femme fatale make their mark in the Decadent period, displaying a cold-blooded cunning that challenges earlier Romantic “women/nature, man/culture” binaries. This course will trace the trajectory of the fatal feminine in French literature from the early nineteenth century into years after World War II, asking what influence historical context, the sex and/or sexuality of the author, and the changing tastes of the larger French readership played in the ever-shifting fantasy of la femme fatale.
ILCS365 01 Creating For Social Change :
4 The Cuban Revolution and the Films of Tomás Gutiérrez Alea Tomás Gutiérrez Alea (1928-1996) is Cuba’s most renowned filmmaker. He was one of the founding members of Cuba’s cinematographic institute, ICAIC. He had a long and illustrious career, directing some of Cuba’s best-known films, including La muerte de un burócrata, Memorias del subdesarrollo, Guantanamera. He is the only Cuban director to have had a film nominated for an Oscar (Fresa y chocolate, 1994), and received a long list of awards and accolades throughout a career spanning more than thirty-five years. One of the salient characteristics of Gutiérrez Alea’s work is that he presented a critical, often satirical view of the failures of the Revolution, while never abandoning his support for the revolutionary process. Despite the opportunities generated by his international acclaim, he continued to live and work in Cuba. In this course we will study many of Gutiérrez Alea’s major films in relationship to the Cuban society which they depict. In some cases we will compare the film to the written source of inspiration (Memorias del subdesarrollo) or to other treatments of the same theme (The Twelve Chairs). We will also engage with theoretical and critical discussions of Gutiérrez Alea’s work. If you have already had the pleasure of seeing some of Gutiérrez Alea’s films in other classes, this is an opportunity to engage with his work in greater breadth and depth. If you have not come across his films before, this is a fresh opportunity. Either way, this is a chance to study them and enjoy them.
PHIL380 01 Philosophical Topics :
Topic: Meditation and the Mind
4 This course will explore meditative practice and its effects on the mind, from the standpoint of first-hand practice; from the perspective of classical Asian and East Asian traditions; from contemporary phenomenological perspectives; and from contemporary empirical research in psychology and neurobiology. Each seminar meeting will begin with meditation practice. N.B. - Because of the practical component of the class, students will be required to purchase a meditation pillow, or zafu.
PHIL380 02 Philosophical Topics :
Responsibility and Reparation
4 In this course we will explore different philosophical accounts of moral responsibility and the obligation to make amends for wrongful actions. We will focus in particular on whether you can justifiably be held responsible for actions that are outside of your control. This will involve studying moral luck, moral dilemmas and the problem of dirty hands, various types of determinism, and whether you can make amends for wrongs committed by another."
POSC385 02 Topics In Pol Sci Or Pub Policy :
Topic: African Politics
4 This course is an introduction to the study of African politics. We will examine a number of salient topics and themes in the study of modern African politics such as colonialism and its consequences, nationalism and independence, the role of the military in African politics, ethnicity, dependency, democracy and political stability. An underlying current in the course will be the tensions that exist between opposing forces in African politics. Some of these influences include anarchy and order, indigenous and foreign influences, democracy and authoritarianism, socialism and capitalism, political demise and development.
POSC385 03 Topics In Pol Sci Or Pub Policy :
Topic: Politics of Protest
4 Political protest is as old as political systems themselves. In the contemporary era, political protest takes the form of actions such as demonstrations, strikes, and even guerilla warfare. This seminar examines the multiple ways in which people engage in political protest, and how they mobilize for human rights and social justice. We will explore why people engage in protest, and examine protest movements in a variety of settings. We will also consider what it means to be a "successful" protest movement. Cases include Tiananmen Square in China, the Palestinian intifada, and the Occupy Wall Street movement in the US.
POSC408 01 Studies In Public Policy :
Politics of Poverty
4 This course explores the political and policy legacies of the American social welfare state. Though often considered to be small, or even non-existent, compared to other western Democracies the American welfare state is actually quite large - but is by design also quite invisible. The manner in which benefits and services are made available are often determined by notions of who is and is not deserving - notions that have changed little in over 200 year.
POSC469 01 Political Theory :
Philosophy of Occupy Wall Street
4 This course examines the political philosophies behind the global Occupy Movement, such as classical and contemporary populism, Marxism, and anarchism, and its ethical ideals such as participatory democracy, nonviolent direct action, and horizontal community organization.
RELG380 01 Religious Topics :
"Religion and Ecology"
4 This course examines the intersection of religion and ecology. We will look at the critique of world religions’ teachings about “creation,” “nature,” the “earth” and the “body” in light of the current global environmental crisis. Which religious belief and value systems contribute to exploitation and contempt for the natural world? Which religious principles and practices enhance protection and reverence for creation and the material world? How have thinkers and activists from various religious traditions responded to the paradigm shifts mandated by ecological thinking? This course exposes students to the fields of comparative religions, theology, ethics and ecology as we probe how religious world views impact social practices – and how changing environmental, political and economic practices impact religious belief systems.
RELG380 02 Religious Topics :
Masculinity in Christ. & Judsm.
4 In Christianity and Judaism, men have struggled with their male identity and have experimented with various notions of masculinity. In this course, we trace some of these developments from late antiquity to post-modernity. Along the way, we will meet martyrs & desert fathers, rabbis & soldiers of Christ, celibates & eunuchs, tough Jews & muscular Christians, gay & straight, "menstruating" men & health enthusiasts.
TFMS225 01 Topics In Film & Media :
4 How did martial arts grow into a popular genre in fiction and film, and how did the genre become a worldwide craze? How do martial arts movies comment on East Asian and North American cultures? The course examines the formation of literary and cinematic conventions of martial arts films, the history of their production in countries such as China, Hong Kong and Japan, and their ideological background. In addition to offering an introduction to filmic technique and Asian popular media, the course dwells on the importance of visual and bodily perception, gender constructions, and intercultural translation.
TFMS260 01 Topics In Dance/Movement :
HIP HOP
4 Explore the history and culture of this dynamic dance form from its roots in the late '70's to its current status as a mainstream marvel. Dance emphasis will be placed on solid hip hop technique, groove, style, and isolated movement and accents. Choreography building blocks and combinations will be introduced in order to build a choreographed routine. Dancewear needed: regular sneakers with low tread strongly recommended. Loose, comfortable clothing a must. No prerequisites.
TFMS425 01 Adv Topics In Film And Media :
ADAPTATION
4 This course will examine the processes and products of adaptation by comparing sources and adapted versions of exemplary works. The aesthetics, apparatuses, and legibility of each medium will receive close attention through a series of case studies that will serve as a basis for theorizing about the rhetorical differences among related media. Readings and screenings will illustrate the distinctive discourses of each studied medium, including novels, play scripts, screenplays, stage, and screen. Adaptation of texts from and into less conventional media, such as serial narrative, graphic novels, comic books, video games, commercial sites, and amusement park venues, will also receive attention. Consideration of how to convert material from one medium to another will enhance understanding of how each medium is produced by writers and artists and consumed by readers and spectators. This class may be used to satisfy an elective requirement of the English major, under the terms stipulated in the English department’s section of the catalog. No prerequisites.