Theater, Film, and Media Studies (TFMS)

Visit the Theater, Film, and Media Studies web site

The field of theater, film, and media combines studies in history, theory, and critical analysis with practical experiences in production techniques and creativity. Its scope includes diverse representations in dynamic time and space, whether on stage or screen. Among its shared subjects are visual culture, performance studies, and techniques for directing, designing, writing, and performing for stage and screen media. Because visual culture plays an ever-increasing role in the production, distribution, and reception of knowledge, studies in theater, film, and media are integral to an undergraduate curriculum in the liberal arts.

Students may focus their studies in theater or in film and media. Both focuses are fundamentally collaborative and multidisciplinary; they thrive in a liberal arts context that promotes breadth and integration of learning. Majors will complete a core of regularly offered courses that exemplifies the diversity of subjects and cultures entailed in this field. The two focuses, theater studies and film and media studies, share some courses that are fundamental to both curricula, but each focus includes opportunities for advanced work in specialized areas of scholarship and artistry. Above all, majors will benefit from an array of course work that emphasizes the reciprocal enrichments of combining scholarship and creative activity. Visiting guests and special topics or experimental courses supplement the regular curriculum.

The curriculum in theater, film, and media studies encourages students to interrogate representations on stage and screen toward an understanding of their historical, cultural, and artistic significance. Additionally, we provide opportunities for students to produce their own works and to collaborate on projects with faculty members and other students. Majors will be prepared to undertake graduate work in related disciplines or careers in related professions.

The department offers minors in theater studies, film and media studies, and dance/movement. Students interested in fulfilling a minor in any of these areas should consult with a faculty member in TFMS. Students may combine a major in either TFMS focus area with a minor in any other TFMS minor area.

By graduation, a student majoring or minoring in theater studies, in film and media studies, or in dance/movement should be able to:

  1. Draw upon a full range of knowledge and skills in theater, film, and media scholarship and practice;
  2. Create and/or appreciate innovative and quality works of theater, performance, film, and media based on historical knowledge and diverse cultural experiences;
  3. Analyze and interpret film, media, scripts, and performance events with special attention to the skills involved in research, performance, directing, design, and dramaturgy;
  4. Communicate effectively with audiences through at least one of the components of representational or visual arts (acting, directing, designing, scriptwriting, filmmaking, dance, etc.);
  5. Realize the rewards of being socially engaged scholars, artists, and audiences;
  6. Pursue graduate study or careers in their chosen field and lifelong achievement as global citizens and creative, critical thinkers.

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR

To earn a bachelor of arts degree with a major in theater, film, and media studies, a student must satisfy the following minimum requirements:

Theater Studies Focus
  1. General College requirements (see "Curriculum" section), including the following requirements to satisfy the major:
  2. A minimum of 48 credit hours of course work, with a grade of C- or above.
    1. Required courses:
      • TFMS 170: Stagecraft
      • TFMS 171: Elements of Design
      • TFMS 200: Theater in History
      • TFMS 220: Introduction to Film and Media Studies or TFMS 221: Film and Media Production Modes
      • TFMS 230: Acting I
      • TFMS 250: Movement I
      • TFMS 300: Modern Theater
      • TFMS 371: Production Lab (one credit hour): Majors must complete a minimum of four credit-hours
    2. One course chosen from:
      • TFMS 251: Introduction to Traditional African Dance
      • TFMS 255: Modern Dance I
      • TFMS 258: Dance in History
      • TFMS 260: Topics in Dance/Movement
      • TFMS 350: Movement II
      • TFMS 355: Modern Dance II
      • TFMS 360: Dance Improvisation and Composition
      • TFMS 460: Advanced Topics in Dance/Movement
    3. One course chosen from:
      • TFMS 310: Shakespeare
      • TFMS 315: Japanese Film
      • TFMS 325: Documentary Practices
      • TFMS 326: World Cinema
      • TFMS 420: Mediated Bodies: Gender, Race, and Class on Stage and Screen
      • Any topics or experimental course numbered 300 or higher and cross-listed in TFMS
    4. One course chosen from:
      • TFMS 340: Directing for the Stage
      • TFMS 374: Lighting Design
      • TFMS 375: Costume Design for Stage and Screen
      • TFMS 376: Scenic Design for Stage and Screen
    5. Senior Experience. This requirement may be satisfied in one of two ways:
      1. Four additional credit hours of course work taken from the 400-level course offerings in theater, film, and media studies, including any approved topics or experimental courses cross-listed in TFMS
        OR
      2. TFMS 493/494: St. Mary's Project: With the approval of the department chair, this requirement may be satisfied by completing eight credit-hours of the St. Mary's Project in any discipline or cross-disciplinary minor.
  3. Satisfactory work on at least three major theater productions in a position of responsibility to be arranged with the technical director.
  4. Participation on run crew: Students are required to participate on at least one run crew in order to satisfy the requirements for the theater studies major. Students may elect to satisfy this requirement as part of the shop hours of TFMS 170 or 171, as Production Lab (TFMS 371), or as Practicum (TFMS 290/490).
Film and Media Studies Focus
  1. General College Requirements (see "Curriculum" section), including the following requirements to satisfy the major:
  2. A minimum of 48 credit hours of course work, with a grade of C- or above.
    1. Required courses:
      • TFMS 130: Idea into Performance
      • TFMS 200: Theater in History or TFMS 300: Modern Theater
      • TFMS 220: Introduction to Film and Media Studies
      • TFMS 221: Film and Media Production Modes
      • TFMS 228: Media Production I
      • TFMS 320: Film History
    2. Two courses chosen from:
      • ANTH 304: Anthropology of Media
      • HIST 380: History of Russian and Soviet Cinema
      • ILAS 350: Latin American Cinema
      • TFMS 315: Japanese Film
      • TFMS 326: World Cinema
      • TFMS 420: Mediated Bodies: Gender, Race, and Class on Stage and Screen
      • Any topics or experimental course numbered 300 or higher and cross-listed in TFMS
    3. Two courses chosen from:
      • ART 212: Introduction to Photography
      • ART 214: Introduction to Digital Media Art
      • TFMS 171: Elements of Design
      • TFMS 230: Acting I or TFMS 234: Acting for the Camera
      • TFMS 340: Directing for the Stage
      • TFMS 346: Screenwriting
      • TFMS 374: Lighting Design
      • TFMS 375: Costume Design for Stage and Screen
      • TFMS 376: Scenic Design for Stage and Screen
    4. One course chosen from:
      • ARTH 410: After Modern Art, 1945 to the Present
      • ENGL 130: (Literary Topics): History of American Film
      • ENGL 400: (Studies in Genre): Film Genre
      • TFMS 325: Documentary Practices
      • TFMS 422: Horror Film: Of Monsters and Monstrosities
      • TFMS 425: Advanced Topics in Film and Media
    5. Senior Experience. This requirement may be satisfied in one of two ways:
      1. Four additional credit hours of course work taken from the 400-level course offerings in theater, film, and media studies, including any approved topics or experimental courses cross-listed in TFMS
        OR
      2. TFMS 493/494: St. Mary's Project: With the approval of the department chair, this requirement may be satisfied by completing eight credit hours of the St. Mary's Project in any discipline or cross-disciplinary study minor.
  3. Satisfactory work on at least one major theater production in a position of responsibility to be arranged with the technical director.

PRODUCTION OPPORTUNITIES

The Department of Theater, Film, and Media Studies supplies the resources for a diverse range of production work on stage and screen. Live performance opportunities include stage productions and dance concerts directed by faculty members, guest artists, and students, performed in a variety of spaces, including the Bruce Davis Theater (main stage), the dance studio, and the White Room. Performance roles, design, and technical positions are open to all students, regardless of their majors. Theater production seasons are formulated to maximize opportunities for working on or attending productions that represent the diversity of theatrical activities across cultures and history.

TFMS resources in media production provide students with access to a variety of video production and post-production technology. Production classes and St. Mary’s Projects have access to Canon GL-2 Mini-DV cameras, Smith-Victor lighting kits, and Audio-Technica microphones, along with supporting production equipment. Post-production equipment in the Montgomery Hall Pro-lab includes 10 22” Intel iMacs w/Mac OS 10.5, Adobe CS3 Suite (Photoshop, Illustrator, Flash, Dreamweaver, Fireworks), Maya 2008 Complete, Quicktime Pro, and Final Cut Studio (Final Cut, Motion, DVD Studio Pro, Soundtrack, Compressor) with dedicated JVC SR-DVM600 3-in-1 MiniDV, 40GB hard disk drive, and DVD player/recorder combo decks. The adjacent Montgomery Hall Learning Lab is equipped with 20 17” Intel iMacs w/Mac OS 10.5, Adobe CS3 Suite (Photoshop, Illustrator, Flash, Dreamweaver, Fireworks), ProTools LE, and several flatbed scanners. Students also have access to a smaller, two-station TFMS editing room that includes two G-5 editing stations w/Mac OS 10.5 and Final Cut Studio (Final Cut, Motion, DVD Studio Pro, Soundtrack, Compressor). TFMS editing lab work stations also include dedicated Mini-DV decks and NTSC output monitors. Additional training and production opportunities are also available at Media Services on the third floor of the College library. More information is available on the web: www.smcm.edu/mediaservices.

Detailed, regularly updated information about our theater and arts seasons and about production opportunities is available on the department web site: www.smcm.edu/tfms.

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR

To complete a minor in dance/movement, film and media studies, or theater studies students must satisfy the following requirements, with a grade of C- or above:

  1. General College requirements.
  2. All requirements in a major field of study.
  3. At least 20 credit hours of course work in dance/movement, film and media studies, or theater studies.
Minor in Dance/Movement

Students choosing to minor in dance/movement are responsible for designing a cohesive area of study in consultation with a member of the department faculty. The minor in dance/movement is 20 credit hours. Each course is four credit-hours, unless otherwise indicated. Students must fulfill the following requirements:

  1. Two courses chosen from the following:
    • TFMS 250: Movement I
    • TFMS 255: Modern Dance I
    • TFMS 258: Dance in History
  2. An additional 12 credit hours chosen from course offerings in dance/movement, including any approved topics or experimental courses cross-listed in TFMS. Four credit hours must be at the 300- or 400-level. Students may include TFMS 290/490: Practicum (one-two credit hours)
Minor in Film and Media Studies

Students choosing to minor in film and media studies are responsible for designing a cohesive area of study in consultation with a member of the department faculty. The minor in film and media studies is 20 credit hours. Each course is four credit hours, unless otherwise indicated. Students must fulfill the following requirements:

  1. TFMS 220: Introduction to Film and Media Studies or TFMS 221: Film and Media Production Modes
  2. TFMS 320: Film History or TFMS 326: World Cinema
  3. An additional 12 credit hours chosen from course offerings in the film and media studies focus area, including any approved topics or experimental courses cross-listed in TFMS. Four credit-hours must be at the 300- or 400-level. Students may include TFMS 290/490: Practicum (one-two credit hours).
Minor in Theater Studies

Students choosing to minor in theater studies are responsible for designing a cohesive area of study in consultation with a member of the department faculty. The minor in theater studies is 20 credit hours. Each course is four credit hours, unless otherwise indicated.

Students must fulfill the following requirements:

  1. TFMS 130: Idea into Performance
  2. TFMS 200: Theater in History or TFMS 300: Modern Theater
  3. An additional 12 credit hours chosen from course offerings in the theater studies focus area, including any approved topics or experimental courses cross-listed in TFMS. Four credit hours must be at the 300- or 400-level. Students may include TFMS 290/490: Practicum (one-two credit hours).

FACULTY

Holly A. Blumner, Michael Ellis-Tolaydo, David Ellsworth, David V. Groupé, Joanne Klein (department chair), Mark A. Rhoda, Merideth M. Taylor, Leon Wiebers

AFFILIATED STAFF

Lane Anderson

THEATER, FILM, AND MEDIA STUDIES (TFMS) COURSES

TFMS 106. Introduction to Dramatic Literature (4F)

Students will study scripts and other related performance materials chosen to exemplify a range of genres, historical periods, and cultures. Readings will assist students toward understanding the social, ideological, and artistic contexts and functions of performance literature. This course may be used to satisfy an elective requirement for the English major, under the terms stipulated in the English Department’s section of the catalog. This course satisfies the Core Curriculum requirement in Arts. Prerequisites: CORE 101, ENGL 102, CORE 301, or NITZ 180.

TFMS 130. Idea into Performance (4E)

Intended for majors and non-majors in theater, film, and media studies, this course is designed to provide a range of first-hand experiences in the creation of performance-based work. Through a series of workshops and creative projects, students will examine and assume the roles of writers, directors, actors, technicians, and audiences. Course work will engage students in the processes of translating ideas into artistic choices that make performance legible. This course satisfies the Core Curriculum requirement in Arts.

TFMS 170. Stagecraft (4F)

An introduction to technical theater, this course will provide the student with a background in the tools, materials, techniques, and processes used in the execution of theatrical designs. Scenery, lighting, stage electrics, and scene painting will be discussed along with such specialty areas as plastics, woodworking joints, and new materials. This course includes a production/crew component as a means of applying the lecture material in an actual production setting. This course satisfies the Core Curriculum requirement in Arts.

TFMS 171. Elements of Design (4S)

This class will provide an introduction to the language and processes of design for theater and film. Areas covered will include the following: design language and terminology, rendering techniques, script analysis and interpretation, drafting, research techniques, and the designer/director relationship. Students are required to purchase basic art and drafting supplies for this class. Classes will include both lecture and laboratory work. This course includes a production/crew component as a means of applying the lecture material in an actual production setting. A lab fee for the class provides specific supplies. This course satisfies the Core Curriculum requirement in Arts.

TFMS 200. Theater in History (4AF)

This course is designed to provide methods and materials for the study of theater history and historiography. Students will undertake a historical exploration of the cultural, theoretical, literary, and practical components of performance practices in a range of periods and cultures. Using selected works of dramatic literature and theatrical performance as a basis for study, the course will introduce concepts in three areas of historical performance: text, performance conventions, and audience. Students will examine major periods of theatrical activity as specific cultural constructions and will learn how the elements of theater are historically determined and how they combine to make meanings on the stage. Sample topics of study will include Asian, Indonesian, African, Western classical, Iberian, European, and American performance traditions from their origins through the mid-19th century. This course satisfies the Core Curriculum requirement in Arts.

TFMS 210. Japanese Performance Traditions (4F)

Japan's rich theater traditions will be explored by examining early Japanese religious rituals and festivals and their evolution into traditional theater forms. The course will focus principally on traditional theater still performed regularly today: noh, kyôgen, bunraku, and kabuki. Instructional methods will include lectures, discussion, readings, slide presentations, and screenings. Several class meetings will also be devoted to learning basic physical movements of performance styles to gain a physical understanding of traditional performance forms. This course may be used to satisfy an elective requirement for the English major, under the terms stipulated in the English Department’s section of the catalog. Satisfies a requirement for a minor in Asian studies and the Core Curriculum requirement in Cultural Perspectives.

TFMS 220. Introduction to Film and Media Studies (4E)

This course will introduce students to concepts, theories, and methods of film and media practices and will provide a basis for further study in the subject. Course materials will encompass film, video, and television studies. Students will examine the production and consumption of screen-based discourses, including image, montage, and sound; apparatus theory and historiography; genres; authorship; issues of gender, race, ethnicity, class, and nation; economics; and looking practices. Assignments will emphasize development of writing, analytical, and research skills. This course may be used to satisfy an elective requirement for the English major, under the terms stipulated in the English Department’s section of the catalog. Satisfies a requirement for a minor in women, gender, and sexuality studies. Satisfies the Core Curriculum requirement in Arts.

TFMS 221. Film and Media Production Modes (4F)

This course introduces students to the critical study of the various modes of film, video, animation, and new media production. The primary modes considered include Classical Hollywood Narrative, Independent film, Art Cinema, International film, Experimental film, Documentary film, Animation, and New Media. The course focuses on the distinctive formal elements of each mode as well as on the historical, cultural, and economic contexts in which each mode is produced and received. This course may be used to satisfy an elective requirement for the English major, under the terms stipulated in the English Department’s section of the catalog. This course satisfies the Core Curriculum requirement in Arts.

TFMS 225. Topics in Film and Media (4)

Study of a theme, problem, movement, or figure in the theory and practice of film and media will constitute the topics field for this course. The subject matter for the semester will be announced prior to each offering of the course. Depending on topic, may be repeated for credit and may be used to satisfy an elective requirement for the English major, under the terms stipulated in the English department’s section of the catalog. This course satisfies the Core Curriculum requirement in Arts.

TFMS 228. Media Production I (4E)

This course teaches the fundamentals of video production and emphasizes hands-on production using small-format video. Students will develop a broad range of skills integral to addressing viewers with moving images and sounds and will also learn to analyze and think critically about the representational strategies central to producing creative work. Students must participate fully in all main stage light hang and focus sessions during the semester in which they are enrolled in the course before credit will be awarded. This course includes a lab fee. This course satisfies the Core Curriculum requirement in Arts.

TFMS 230. Acting I (4F)

An introduction to the fundamentals of acting, this course will introduce acknowledged approaches to the craft and then begin the process by which students will develop their own system of approaching a role. Improvisation, scene study, voice, and a variety of other acting resources will be explored. This course satisfies the Core Curriculum requirement in Arts.

TFMS 232. Voice and Speech for the Actor (4AS)

This course is designed for students interested in the mechanics and skills of vocal production. Students will study phonetics and focus on exercises which improve the use of pitch and intonation; explore the uses of rhythm and the rate of speech; work on vocal support and placement; and increase the awareness of negative vocal qualities, such as breathiness or nasality. Students will work on exercises designed to improve articulation, lip, tongue, and jaw movement for a cleaner production of sounds. This course respects cultural and regional identity and does not subscribe to the theory that these identities should be eliminated in order to achieve “correct speech.” This course satisfies the Core Curriculum requirement in Arts.

TFMS 234. Acting for the Camera (4AS)

This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of acting for the camera, including methodologies for developing an approach to screen acting for television and film. Instruction will include, but not be limited to, study of practical and artistic techniques in textual analysis, blocking for the camera, hitting marks, and out-of-sequence shooting. This course satisfies the Core Curriculum requirement in Arts.

TFMS 250. Movement I (4E)

This course is designed for students interested in self-growth and/or performance: to heighten students' awareness and understanding of their own bodies and movement habits and the process and importance of non-verbal communication. Corrective work in basic movement mechanics leads to increased flexibility and fitness, better alignment and less stress in performing everyday movements, and to a more relaxed, confident presence on stage. Tools of movement analysis and terminology are presented. Improvisation frees inhibitions, challenges the imagination, and develops students' abilities to work well within a group. This course satisfies the Core Curriculum requirement in Arts.

TFMS 251. Introduction to Traditional African Dance (4F)

This course will provide an introduction to traditional dance and music of selected African cultures. Through learning basic patterns of selected dances, students will develop a technical base serving the specific requirements of performance of African dance. In addition to the learning and performance of dances, course methods and materials include readings, video viewing, and discussion designed to provide students with an understanding and appreciation of the significance of the dance in traditional African society and its relation to the other arts. This course satisfies the Core Curriculum requirement in Cultural Perspectives.

TFMS 255. Modern Dance I (4S)

This course covers technique and fundamental principles of modern dance. Emphasis is on the intelligent, informed use of the body applied to dance as a performance art form. Theory and practice of improvisation will be introduced, and classes are designed to stimulate mind and body. This course satisfies the Core Curriculum requirement in Arts.

TFMS 258. Dance in History (4AS)

Designed for the general student, this course will serve as an introduction to dance as a theatrical art form and an expression of popular culture. The function and significance of dance will be examined in relationship to historical periods and a variety of cultures. Particular emphasis will be placed on the development of 20th-century American dance and its roots in Asian, European, and African traditions. This course satisfies the Core Curriculum requirement in Arts.

TFMS 260. Topics in Dance/Movement (4)

This course involves study of an aspect of dance or movement technique or theory (jazz dance, dance therapy, mask study, international dance, stage combat). Subject matter will be announced prior to each offering of the course. Depending on topic, may be repeated for credit. This course satisfies the Core Curriculum requirement in Arts.

TFMS 275. Costumes and Clothes in History (4AF)

A survey of the evolution of clothing styles through history with an emphasis on Western costume. Study of historical costume as it reflects sociological, psychological, economic, political, artistic, technological, and other factors. Among the topics discussed in the class are the ways in which social rank, ethnicity, and gender manifest themselves through clothing and adornment, and how the historic evolution of clothing reflects changing roles of women and various historically marginalized groups. Satisfies a requirement for a minor in women, gender, and sexuality studies. Satisfies the Core Curriculum requirement in Arts.

TFMS 280. Topics in Production (4)

A study of several aspects of theatrical or film production at an introductory level will constitute the topic area for this course. Exemplary areas may include, but are not limited to, makeup, scenic painting, and costume construction. The subject matter for the semester will be announced prior to each offering of the course. Depending on topic, may be repeated for credit and a lab fee may be assessed. This course satisfies the Core Curriculum requirement in Arts.

TFMS 290, 490. Practicum (1-4E)

A student may receive one to two credit hours for working on a major dramatic production. Practicum can be earned through participation in all facets of production from performing to technical work. A minimum of 50 hours of work is required for one credit hour. A maximum of two credit hours may be earned on any one production. A student may earn up to four credit hours by participating in two major productions during a semester. Rigorous grading standards will apply. Practicum may be repeated for credit. A maximum of 12 credit hours of practicum credit may be applied toward graduation. Prerequisite: Permission of TFMS staff required.

TFMS 300. Modern Theater (4AF)

As the second course in the theater history sequence, the subject for study will be the recent sources and forms of contemporary theater. Course work will begin with the advent of Realism in Western drama and will explore its transformation into other modes of signification as a consequence of political conflicts, technological developments, social movements, intercultural influences, and critical theories. Topics will include Naturalism, Expressionism, Surrealism, Epic Theater, Absurdist Theater, Guerrilla Theater, Performance Art, Cultural Pluralism, and the major innovators of modern theater practices. This course may be used to satisfy an elective requirement for the English major, under the terms stipulated in the English Department’s section of the catalog. Satisfies a requirement for a minor in women, gender, and sexuality studies. Prerequisite: TFMS 200 or consent of the instructor.

TFMS 310. Shakespeare (4AF)

Through consideration of representative comedies, histories, tragedies, and later romances, this course will develop an understanding of Shakespeare's plays as texts written for and animated by performance. Students will approach the scripts from two viewpoints: a stage-centered perspective that examines the contributions of historical and immediate production, and a comparative study that focuses on common themes, structures, language, and other literary devices in the plays. This course may be used to satisfy an elective requirement for the English major, under the terms stipulated in the English Department’s section of the catalog. Prerequisites: At least one literature course and junior or senior standing.

TFMS 315. Japanese Film (4AF)

This course will introduce students to the political and sociological histories of Japan through the lens of select pre- and post-World War II Japanese films, including animé. Study of major film directors, genres, or historical and cultural events may constitute the focus of the course. Instructional methods will include lectures, discussions, readings, film screenings, presentations, and research papers. This course may be used to satisfy an elective requirement for the English major, under the terms stipulated in the English Department’s section of the catalog. Satisfies a requirement for a minor in Asian studies.

TFMS 320. Film History (4S)

This course will focus on noteworthy periods, movements, and genres in film history from the late silent era (e.g., Soviet Montage) to the present (e.g., Dogme 95), and will examine the transnational aesthetic and ideological influences of their practitioners. Exemplary periods, movements, and genres to be studied might include, but are not limited to: Soviet Montage; German Expressionism; the classical Hollywood narrative cinema; film noir; European and Latin American New Wave and Neorealist movements; Hong Kong cinema; and contemporary political modernism. Instructional methods will include lectures, film screenings, discussions, readings, writing assignments, and examinations. This course may be used to satisfy an elective requirement for the English major, under the terms stipulated in the English Department’s section of the catalog. Prerequisite: TFMS 220, 221, or consent of the instructor.

TFMS 325. Documentary Practices (4S)

This course will interrogate the practices and problems arising from documentary depictions. By interrogating techniques and technologies of production and reception of meanings in a series of films chosen for their specific development of issues arising from documentary depiction, students will learn how to think critically about reciprocities between the real and the represented—the extent to which the two are contingent on each other. Topics will cover live performance, ethnographic filmmaking, documentary history, evidentiary and political uses, live coverage, re-enactments, "reality TV," and computer simulation. Materials will include screenings of films as well as readings in film theory, performance studies, cyberculture, and cultural studies. Instructional methods will include lectures, discussions, readings, presentations, writing assignments, and examinations. This course may be used to satisfy an elective requirement for the English major, under the terms stipulated in the English Department’s section of the catalog. Satisfies a requirement for a minor in women, gender, and sexuality studies. Prerequisite: TFMS 220, 221, or consent of the instructor.

TFMS 326. World Cinema (4S)

This course undertakes a survey and analysis of world film production in an effort to understand the relationship between world cinema and national culture. With reference to the U.S. film industry as a dominant model, the course explores the aesthetic, economic, historical, and ideological contexts for film production and reception in other countries. This course may be used to satisfy an elective requirement for the English major, under the terms stipulated in the English Department’s section of the catalog. Satisfies requirements for a minor in African and African Diaspora studies, Asian studies, and women, gender, and sexuality studies.

TFMS 330. Workshop in Acting (4)

This course provides students with an opportunity to pursue advanced work in acting. Area of emphasis will be announced each time the course is offered. Depending on topic, may be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor.

TFMS 331. Acting II (4)

This course will emphasize scene work and continue the actor's development toward a personal, systematic approach to building characters. Exercises in observation, behavior patterns, character psychology, improvisation, voice, and movement will be included. Prerequisite: TFMS 230 or consent of the instructor.

TFMS 340. Directing for the Stage (4AF)

This course will introduce the fundamentals of stage directing through the execution of projects designed to provide a range of experiences in approaching particular problems of stage directing. Students will develop strategies for analyzing scripts in order to make directorial choices that are responsive, legible, and manageable, and they will learn the processes for communicating these choices to actors and designers. Prerequisite: TFMS 230 or consent of the instructor.

TFMS 346. Screenwriting (4AF)

This course introduces students to the art of screenwriting through the study of screenplays, films, and basic techniques and forms of the screenwriter. The main project for this class is writing and revising a major screenwriting project. Students work through the various stages of screenplay writing: researching the subject, pitching the idea to the class, writing a treatment, developing biographies for characters, developing an outline of scenes, and work-shopping multiple drafts of the script with classmates. This course may be used to satisfy an elective requirement for the English major, under the terms stipulated in the English Department’s section of the catalog.

TFMS 350. Movement II (4AS)

A continuation of Movement I. The emphasis of this course is on theory and practice of movement characterization and special performance challenges, such as stylized or nonrealistic performance, stage falls, combat, and historical styles. A variety of approaches, including masks, animal movement, and psychological gesture are employed as a means to physicalize dramatic characters. Class work includes ongoing work on fundamental movement skills and principles. Prerequisite: TFMS 250.

TFMS 355. Modern Dance II (4AF)

This course covers technique, improvisation, and principles of modern dance at an intermediate level. Emphasis is on the intelligent, informed use of the body applied to dance as a performance art form. Though the focus will be on modern dance technique and improvisation, other contemporary dance styles, including jazz, will be introduced. Prerequisite: TFMS 255 or consent of the instructor.

TFMS 360. Dance Improvisation and Composition (4)

This course is designed to provide experiences in synthesizing theory and praxis in the creation of performance studies. Emphasis is on creative expression and the development of specific tools with which to compose, direct, and perform original work. The relationship of improvisation to composition is explored and the current movement towards interdisciplinary performance art is reflected. Students investigate a wide variety of source materials for performance projects. Prerequisite: TFMS 255 or consent of the instructor.

TFMS 371. Production Lab (1E)

All declared theater studies majors in theater, film, and media studies must complete  four credit hours of Production Lab. Each credit is equivalent to 30 hours, to be distributed in the following areas: a) Scenery & Paint; b) Costumes & Wardrobe; c) Production Assistance (crew, lights, props, etc.); and d) Student's Choice. The technical director and scenographer/designer will assign students to an area each semester.  The purpose of the course is to provide students with experience in the practices of technical theater as well as to lead them to a fuller understanding of the contributions of this work to the creative process. Students must participate fully in all main stage light hang and focus sessions each semester before credit will be awarded. Open to all students. May be repeated for credit.

TFMS 374. Lighting Design (4AS)

A study of the theories, principles, and tools of lighting design for theater, film, and video, this course will focus primarily on developing the student's ability to see, understand, and manipulate light in respect to its physical and psychological properties. Topics will include properties and functions of light, color theory, instrumentation and placement, script analysis, drafting, and basic electricity. Projects will include analysis of light in various media (paintings, film, photographs) and a design for a theoretical production. Students will be required to participate on the lighting crew for one production during the semester. Prerequisites: TFMS 170, 171, or consent of the instructor.

TFMS 375. Costume Design for Stage and Screen (4AS)

The goal of this course is to introduce students to costuming and costume design for theater and film. Through the study of plays, history, and cultural silhouettes, students will apply sketching, drawing skills, and color techniques in order to interpret clothing styles for the theater. An understanding and visualization of character will be realized through research, clothing analysis, and appropriate textile applications. Students will learn how to design costume plots and charts, how to manage budgets, and how to prepare for portfolio presentations. Students will be required to participate in a design-related production crew during the semester. A lab fee for the class provides specific art supplies. Prerequisites: TFMS 171, 275, or consent of the instructor.

TFMS 376. Scenic Design for Stage and Screen (4AS)

A study of the processes and techniques of creating scenic environments for theatrical and film productions, this course will approach scene design from such perspectives as realism, conceptual or thematic aesthetics, cultural traditions, and/or period styles. An understanding of the visualization of space and place will be realized through research, script analysis and interpretation, drawing, painting, drafting, budget management, and portfolio presentation. Students will be required to participate in a design-related production crew during the semester. A lab fee for the class provides specific art supplies. Prerequisites: TFMS 170, 171, or consent of the instructor.

TFMS 390. Theater Seminar: Production Contexts (2-4)

This seminar will be offered in conjunction with particular main stage productions and will examine artistic practices and contextual issues associated with the processes of creating the work. Topics will vary according to specific productions but may explore related problems of dramaturgy, history, culture, or craft. The course may be offered in full- or half-semester formats and will sometimes be taught by guest artists. May be repeated for credit.

TFMS 392. The Teaching of Theater in the Schools K-12 (4AS)

This course provides pre-professional experience in a school setting for students seeking teacher certification in drama K-12. It serves as an introduction to the problems, issues, curriculum, and methods for teaching drama to students of all ages based on what is known about their developmental nature and needs. Topics include instructional objectives, teaching strategies, reading and writing across the curriculum, and evaluation techniques. Class members will practice a variety of effective instructional strategies, participate in field experience, and study generic issues of discipline and management that cross content-specific boundaries. This course satisfies the Core Curriculum requirement in Experiencing the Liberal Arts in the World. This course is open to any student with an interest in working with students in public school classrooms or teaching at any level. Prerequisite: PSYC 230, EDUC/PSYC 368, or consent of the instructor.

TFMS 405. Topics in Performance Studies (4)

Consideration of a theme, problem, movement, or major figure(s) in dramatic literature, theory, or criticism will make up the topics field for this course. The subject matter for the semester will be announced prior to each offering of the course. Depending on the topic, it may be repeated for credit and prerequisites may apply. Check the online “Schedule of Classes” for topics and prerequisites.

TFMS 420. Mediated Bodies: Gender, Race, and Class on Stage and Screen (4AS)

The subject of study will be the marking of bodies by electronic and live performance media. Students will explore how representations of bodies in these media (principally films) interrelate with social constructions of gender, race, class, sexuality, age, disease, and criminality in postmodern culture. By interrogating techniques and technologies of production and reception of meanings, students will learn how to think critically about the discursive formations of subjects, others, and visual culture. Materials will include screenings as well as readings in film theory, performance studies, cyberculture, and cultural studies. Instructional methods will include lectures, discussions, readings, presentations, writing assignments, and examinations. This course may be used to satisfy an elective requirement for the English major, under the terms stipulated in the English department’s section of the catalog. Satisfies requirements for a minor in African and African Diaspora studies and women, gender, and sexuality studies. Prerequisites: One previous or concurrent course in AADS or WGSX, or consent of the instructor.

TFMS 422. Horror Film: Of Monsters and Monstrosities  (4AF)

This course will examine evolving conceptions of the monster and of monstrosity in select horror films from the late silent era (e.g. the German Expressionist vampire classic, Nosferatu, A Symphony of Horror) to the present (e.g. the Japanese revenge dramas of Takashi Miike and the cyberpunk horror of Shinya Tsukamoto). Concomitantly, it will examine the aesthetics of cinematic horror by situating readings of the films’ iconographic elements within broader historical, social, political, and cultural perspectives. In doing so, students will interrogate the films’ constructions of categories of gender, race, class, sexuality, identity, and the family. Instructional methods will include lectures, film screenings, discussions, readings, writing assignments, and examinations. This course may be used to satisfy an elective requirement of the English major, under the terms stipulated in the English Department’s section of the catalog. This course satisfies a requirement for a minor in women, gender, and sexuality studies. Prerequisite: TFMS 220, 221, or consent of the instructor.

TFMS 425. Advanced Topics in Film and Media (4)

This course is a specialized study of a theme, problem, movement, or figure in the theory and practice of film and media. Included among potential topics: feminist film theory; television and the construction of race, gender, sexuality, class, and ethnicity; identity formations in cybermedia; narrative production of "home" in daytime soap operas; science fiction films and commodifications of future; or Steven Spielberg and the phenomenon of mall movies. The subject matter for the semester will be announced prior to each offering of the course. Depending on the topic, this course may be used to satisfy an elective requirement for the English major, under the terms stipulated in the English Department’s section of the catalog. Depending on the topic, it may be repeated for credit and prerequisites may apply. Check the online “Schedule of Classes” for topics and prerequisites.

TFMS 440. Directing II (4AS)

This course will depart from traditional fundamentals of stage directing by familiarizing students with avant-garde and culturally diverse models for performance. Students will undertake a series of projects that will investigate these models through experiment with scripted and non-scripted materials. The course will be conducted primarily as a practicum in experimental directing, and its particular content will depend to some extent on student selections of performance projects. Prerequisite: TFMS 340 or consent of the instructor.

TFMS 460. Advanced Topics in Dance/Movement (4)

This course involves advanced study of an aspect of dance or movement technique or theory (for example, jazz dance, dance therapy, mask study, international dance, stage combat). Subject matter and credit value will be announced prior to each offering of the course. Depending on the topic, it may be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: TFMS 255 or consent of the instructor.

TFMS 480. Advanced Topics in Production (4)

This course is a specialized study of an aspect of theatrical or film production. The subject matter for the semester will be announced prior to each offering of the course. Depending on the topic, the course may be repeated for credit, may include a lab fee, and prerequisites may apply. Check the online "Schedule of Classes" for topics, prerequisites, and lab fees.

TFMS 493/494. St. Mary's Project (8E)

This project, which may take many forms, draws on and extends knowledge, skills of analysis, and creative achievement developed through previous academic work. The student initiates the project, identifies an area to be explored, and proposes a method of inquiry appropriate to the topic. The project should include a reflection on the social context, the body of literature, or the conceptual framework to which it is a contribution. It must be shared with the College community through posters, presentations, or other means. Open to non-majors. Prerequisites: Senior standing and approval of faculty mentor and department chair(s) of the student’s major(s). Consult faculty mentor for project guidelines.

TFMS 398, 498. Off-Campus Internship (8-16E)

A variety of off-campus experiential learning opportunities can be arranged through the Career Development Center. The off-campus internship is an individually designed experience that allows the student to explore the relationship between learning in the classroom and the practical application of knowledge in everyday work situations. Prerequisites: Admission to the Internship Program and approval of the TFMS faculty. (See "Internships" under "Academic Policies" section.) Credit/no credit grading. May be repeated for credit.

TFMS 199, 299, 399, 499. Independent Study (1-4E)

This course consists of an independent creative or research project designed by the student and supervised by a TFMS faculty member. The nature of the project, the schedule for accomplishment, and the means of evaluation must be formalized prior to registration in a learning contract. (See "Independent Study" under "Academic Policies" section.) May be repeated for credit.