Art and Art History

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The art program involves the student in three basic approaches: a study of theories underlying art, a study of art history, and an exploration of studio principles ranging from basic techniques to the creation of art in various media. In offering this curriculum, the art faculty has the following objectives: to increase intellectual understanding and aesthetic enjoyment of visual arts, to provide basic instruction in and exploration of various art techniques, to stimulate students to creative activity in the visual arts, and to prepare students for graduate work or for careers in art and other professions. Students in art may focus their studies in studio arts or in art history.

Students in the art major will:

  1. Understand the central techniques, methods, and theories of artistic practice and art historical analysis.
  2. Develop a basic understanding of the global history of artistic production, reception, and theory.
  3. Use critical thinking to create and interpret works of art.
  4. Apply cross-disciplinary knowledge in creative work and art historical research.
  5. Learn effective oral, written, and visual communication skills in relation to individual artworks, art historical context, and art theory.

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR

To earn a bachelor of arts degree with a major in art, a student must satisfy the following minimum requirements:

  1. General College Requirements (see “Curriculum” section), including the following requirements to satisfy the major:
  2. At least 13 courses carrying art credit and a minimum of 48 credit hours, in all of which the student must earn a grade of C- or better and a cumulative grade-point average of at least 2.00, including the following:
  3. Two core courses:
    • ART 105: Introduction to Visual Thinking
    • ARTH 100: Introduction to Art History
For the studio art focus:
  1. Two additional required studio courses:
    • ART 204: Introduction to Drawing
    • ART 214: Introduction to Digital Media Art
  2. Five courses chosen in consultation with and approved by an art faculty adviser to constitute an integrated area of focus in studio art. This area of focus should include course work on both the introductory and advanced levels:
    1. One advanced-level course chosen from the following:
      • ART 304: Advanced Drawing
      • ART 306: Advanced Painting
      • ART 308: Advanced Sculpture
      • ART 309: Advanced Drawing + Printmaking
      • ART 312: Advanced Photography
      • ART 314: Advanced Digital and Time Based Art
    2. Two additional studio elective courses, one of which might be the introductory course that serves as the prerequisite for one of the courses listed above.
    3. Two additional elective courses selected from any studio art, art history or art theory offerings.
  3. One course in Art History
  4. One course in Art Theory
One of the following two options for a senior capstone experience totaling 8 credit-hours:
  1. The following two courses for the St. Mary’s Project:
    • ART 493: St. Mary’s Project in Studio Art I
    • ART 494: St. Mary’s Project in Studio Art II
  2. Two 300- or 400- level art studio courses chosen in consultation with and approved by an art adviser. One of these courses must be selected from the following list:
    • ART 304: Advanced Drawing
    • ART 306: Advanced Painting
    • ART 308: Advanced Sculpture
    • ART 309: Advanced Drawing + Printmaking
    • ART 312: Advanced Photography
    • ART 314: Advanced Digital and Time Based Art
    • Note: some of these 300-level courses above have a prerequisite of the corresponding introductory course in the specific media area. This introductory course must be taken before completing this requirement and can be counted as one of the three studio electives required for the studio focus.
For the art history focus:
  1. Four additional courses in art history, two of which are focused on the study of Western art and two of which are focused on the study of non-western art.
  2. Two courses in art theory.
  3. One additional art studio course
  4. Senior Experience. This requirement may be satisfied in one of two ways:
    1. ARTH 493/494: St. Mary’s Project in Art History. With the approval of the department, and in consultation with an art history faculty adviser, the student completes eight credit hours of the St. Mary’s Project in art history, or in any other discipline or cross-disciplinary area.
    2. ARTH 490: Senior Experience in Art History. With the approval of the department, and in consultation with an art history faculty adviser, the student completes Senior Experience in Art History (ARTH 490).
  5. Additional elective courses to bring the courses taken for the major to a minimum of 13 courses and a minimum of 48 credit hours, chosen in consultation with an art history faculty adviser and approved by the art faculty as a plan of study. With art faculty approval, electives may include courses in other departments.

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR

To complete a minor in art studio or in art history, students must satisfy the following requirements:

  1. General College requirements
  2. All requirements in a major field of study other than art and art history.
  3. At least six courses carrying art and art history credit that total no less than 22 credit hours, in all of which the student must earn a grade of C- or better, including the following:
For the art studio minor:
  1. Four courses in art studio.
  2. One additional course chosen from the following:
    • ART 304: Advanced Drawing
    • ART 306: Advanced Painting
    • ART 308: Advanced Sculpture
    • ART 309: Advanced Drawing + Printmaking
    • ART 312: Advanced Photography
    • ART 314: Advanced Digital and Time Based Art
  3. ARTH 100: Introduction to Art History
For the art history minor:
  1. ARTH 100: Introduction to Art History
  2. Three additional art history courses (at least one course designated as non-western)
  3. One art theory course
  4. One art studio course

COOPERATIVE PROGRAMS IN ART EDUCATION

The requirements for Maryland’s teacher certification in art (K-12) can be met at St. Mary’s College. Completion of the combined requirements for the art major and teacher certification might require study beyond the usual eight semesters necessary for the bachelor’s degree alone. Because careful attention to course selection is necessary as early as the first semester of the first year, students interested in teaching art should consult with the chair of the Department of Educational Studies and their art faculty advisers as soon as they are accepted for admission to the College.

FACULTY

Colby Caldwell, Cristin Cash, Billy Friebele, Sue Johnson, Joe Lucchesi, Carrie Patterson (department chair), Lisa Scheer

ART HISTORY COURSES (ARTH)

ARTH 100. Introduction to Art History (4E)

An introduction to both art history and its methodologies that will prepare students to analyze and understand art and architecture from diverse regions and time periods. Critical examination of artworks considers both their process of creation and their meaning in cultural context. Using case studies from prehistory to contemporary times, the course is subdivided to explore some of the general themes that often provide meaning to artistic expression, including space/place, the body, institutional and private patronage, and self-expression. Special emphasis is given to developing skills of visual, iconographic and contextual analysis, comparative study, and the interpretation of primary documents and secondary sources. Slide presentations, lectures, and discussion. This course satisfies the Core Curriculum requirement in Humanistic Foundations.

ARTH 220. Rock, Paper, Sword: The Media of the Ancient and Medieval World (4A)

An introduction to the art of the ancient and medieval world. Utilizing the three elements of rock, paper, and sword, this course examines how different Western, Asian, and Islamic cultures approached art in these media. Exploring rock involves both architecture and sculptural representation; examining paper engages issues of two-dimensional media and the sweeping changes caused by the introduction of paper; and considering the sword includes both the production of metalwork and the artistic scope of ancient and medieval empires. A museum visit as well as the College’s collection of plaster casts and artifacts will be integral to the course. Slide presentations, lectures, and discussion. This course satisfies the Core Curriculum requirement in Arts.

ARTH 224. Ancient American Art and Architecture (4AF)

An introduction to the art and architecture of the Americas before the Spanish Conquest. The course surveys a diverse range of cultures including Native Americans of the Southeast, Southwest, and Plains regions of the United States; the Olmec, Teotihuacan, Maya, and Aztec of Mesoamerica; and Andean empires from Chavin through the Inca. Analysis takes an interdisciplinary approach to examine the form, function, and symbolism of Ancient-American art and architecture and its role in the construction and maintenance of political power, religious belief and practice, concepts of space, and bodily performance. Slide presentations, lectures and discussion. This course satisfies the Core Curriculum requirement in Cultural Perspectives.

ARTH 250. Topics in Art History (4)

Various topics in art history, each representing an introduction to an aspect of the discipline. May be repeated for credit if the topic is not repetitive. For a description of each course, see the current online Schedule of Classes. This course satisfies the Core Curriculum requirement in Arts.

ARTH 306. American Art (4AF)

A study of architecture, sculpture, and painting in the United States from the colonial period to the present. Emphasis is given to special problems such as the influence of European traditions, the development of specifically American visual forms, the issue of minority representation as both artists and subjects, and the emergence of the United States as a center of artistic influence in the modern and contemporary period. Slide presentations, lectures, and discussion. Prerequisite is one of the following: ARTH 100, one 200-level ARTH course, or consent of instructor.

ARTH 310. Art in Europe, 1500-1850 (4AS)

A study of painting, sculpture and architecture in Western Europe. Issues of religious and state patronage, the development and influence of art academies, and the relation between art and civic identity are featured. Slide presentations, lectures, and discussion. Prerequisite is one of the following: ARTH 100, one 200-level ARTH course, or consent of instructor.

ARTH 314. Race and Representation (4A)

A study of art produced by racial and ethnic minorities in the United States. The course examines the production of individual artists, considers some historical, political, and theoretical underpinnings that inform their production, and provides a particular lens for exploring the history of race relations in the United States. Depending on the instructor, this course will focus specifically on African-American or Chicano/a art. Slide presentations, lectures and discussion. This course may be repeated once for credit if the topic is not repetitive. Prerequisite is one of the following: ARTH 100, one 200-level ARTH course, or consent of instructor.

ARTH 316. Modern Art, 1850-1945 (4AS)

A study of important developments in painting and sculpture during the modern period. The emergence of the avant-garde, the development of abstract art, and the relation between art and modern culture will be examined. Slide presentations, lectures, discussion. Prerequisite is one of the following: ARTH 100, one 200-level ARTH course, or consent of instructor.

ARTH 321. Art and Architecture of the Ancient Maya (4AS)

A study of the artistic traditions and history of Maya civilization before the Spanish Conquest. The course presents significant structures and monuments, imparts a basic knowledge of the hieroglyphic writing system, and surveys the volatile political history of the region. In particular, the course concentrates on the role of the visual arts in the construction, maintenance and public presentation of elements of royal identity and cosmic order that reinforced the tenuous political power of Maya rulers. Slide presentations, lectures and discussion. Prerequisite is one of the following: ARTH 100, one 200-level ARTH course, or consent of instructor.

ARTH 322. Native North American Art and Architecture (4AS)

A study of the art and architecture produced by ancient and historic Native American cultures in select regions of the United States and Northern Mexico. A portion of the course will also focus on works created by 20th-century Native artists from all regions of the United States and Canada. This course presents specific works of art, architecture and performance in the context of their creation and usage within the greater culture. Particular emphasis is placed on the role of the visual arts in the construction and representation of Native American ethnic and gender identity and Euro-American conceptions of authenticity. Slide presentations, lectures and discussion. Prerequisite is one of the following: ARTH 100, one 200-level ARTH course, or consent of instructor.

ARTH 331. Topics in Modern and Contemporary Latin American Art (4AF)

A selective study of art produced in Latin America in the 20th and 21st centuries. This course examines the work of individual artists and artist collectives across a variety of visual media including painting, graphic arts, sculpture, photography, film, new media and performance. Countries considered may include Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Cuba, and Mexico. Slide presentations, lectures and discussion. May be repeated for credit where the topic is not repetitive. Prerequisite is one of the following: ARTH 100, one 200-level ARTH course, or consent of instructor.

ARTH 350. Advanced Topics in Art History (4)

Various topics in art history, each representing study of an aspect of the discipline at an advanced level. ARTH 350 may be repeated for credit if the topic is not repetitive. For a description of each course and its prerequisites, see the current online Schedule of Classes.

ARTH 490. Senior Experience in Art History (4E)

Advanced work in art history designed to synthesize materials from different course work within the major. Students join an art history or art theory topics course (ARTH 350/450) as the context for their senior experience. The synthesizing goal is achieved in the writing of a paper that addresses the content of both the topics course and another selected upper-level course. Selection of the two courses must be made in consultation with and approved by the art history faculty. Prerequisite: approval of art history faculty adviser.

ARTH 493/494. St. Mary’s Project in Art History (1-8E)

The St. Mary’s Project in art history is an extensive independent study that focuses on art objects, theories, or issues. The project may take many forms, such as a research paper, an exhibition of selected objects presented with a catalog, or a video documenting and analyzing an architectural site or a display of public art. The work may be undertaken in conjunction with study abroad or a museum internship; or it may be focused to objects in museums in Washington, D.C., or Baltimore; or in the St. Mary’s College Teaching Collection of Art. In consultation with a faculty mentor, the student identifies a topic that is supported by that student’s previous academic work. A formal proposal includes a statement of the substance of the project, the methodologies that will be employed, and the contribution that the project will make to the discipline of art history. The project will be presented to the College community through a means appropriate to the form of the project, such as an exhibition or a report of research findings. The work is supervised by a faculty mentor. Prerequisite: approval of the faculty mentor and the chair of the Art and Art History Department. Project guidelines are provided by the faculty mentor.

ARTH 398, 498. Off-Campus Internship (4-16E)

Off-campus experiential learning opportunity. A variety of internships can be arranged through the Career Development Center subject to the approval of the art history faculty. The off-campus internship is an individually-designed experience that allows the student to explore the relationship between learning and everyday work situations. Prerequisites: admission to the Internship Program and approval of the department chair. (See “Internships” under “Academic Polices” section.) Credit/no credit grading.

ARTH 199, 299, 399, 499. Independent Study (1-4E)

This course consists of an independent reading or research project designed by the student and supervised by an art history faculty member. The nature of the project, the schedule for accomplishment, and the means of evaluation must be formalized in a learning contract prior to registration. (See “Independent Study” under “Academic Policies” section.)

ART THEORY COURSES

ARTH 260. Topics in Art Theory (4)

Selected topics in art theory studied in the context of the work of an artist, art movement, or a special problem. This course may be repeated for credit if the topic is not repetitive. For a description of each course and its prerequisites, see the current online “Schedule of Classes.” This course satisfies the Core Curriculum requirement in Arts.

ARTH 367. Color (4A)

This applied theory course explores the history of and motivations behind our use of color as it 
relates to art objects. It is an intermediate studio art class that integrates historical 
and contemporary color theory with studio art projects. Working with water-based paint and collage, students will apply what they learn to a series of studio projects. Group discussions, critiques, and written assignments will reflect 
class readings including literature, theory, historical texts, and artist statements. Formerly ART 237. Not open to students who have received credit for ART 237.

ARTH 382. Sexuality and Modernity (4A)

This course explores 20th century and contemporary art through changing conceptions of sexual identity. The course focuses on the visual arts as a primary means through which gender and sexuality were elaborated, negotiated, and enforced during the last 100 years, from the turn-of-the-century emergence of the “gay and lesbian individual” to ongoing shifts in conceptions of sex and gender roles. The course will consider style, content, and production contexts in diverse media, including painting, sculpture, photography, and performance. Seminar format, readings, and discussion. Prerequisite is one of the following: ARTH 100, one 200-level ARTH course, one course in Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, or consent of instructor.

ARTH 410. After Modern Art, 1945 to the Present (4AF)

This course explores the conceptual foundations of contemporary art from abstract expressionism to the present, with particular focus on issues such as the modernist artist-hero; the emergence of alternative or non-traditional media; the influence of the women’s movement and the gay/lesbian liberation movement on contemporary art; and postmodern theory and practice. Slide presentations, lecture, and discussion. Formerly ART 460. Not open to students who received credit for ART 460. Prerequisite is one of the following: ARTH 100, one 200-level ARTH course, or consent of instructor.

ARTH 425. The Artist in Context (4S)

This applied theory course explores the development of effective presentation materials by which studio artists contextualize, articulate and document the intentions of their own creative work. Course activities include learning how to write effective visual analysis and artist statements, photograph and digitally document artworks, create online portfolios, and prepare a variety of professional presentation materials such as résumés and letters of application. Course work culminates with students creating their own online portfolio. This course satisfies an art theory requirement for art majors with a concentration in studio art. Formerly ART 425. Not open to students who have received credit for ART 425. Prerequisite: One 300-level studio art course or consent of instructor.

ARTH 440. Advanced Topics in Applied Art Theory (4)

Selected topics in art theory studied at an advanced level in an applied, experiential context. Individual course topics will vary with the instructor, but will generally focus on curatorial issues, the relationship between theory and studio practice, exhibition development and design, object research, or museum and collections ethics. Seminar format, readings, discussion and fieldwork. This course may be repeated for credit where the topic is not repetitive. For a description of each course and its prerequisites, consult the current online “Schedule of Classes.”

ARTH 450. Advanced Topics in Art Theory (4)

Selected topics in art theory studied at an advanced level in the context of the work of an artist, art movement, or a special problem. This course may be repeated for credit if the topic is not repetitive. For a description of each course and its prerequisites, see the current online “Schedule of Classes.”

ARTH 470. Critical Approaches to the Analysis of Art (4S)

This course explores the production and analysis of art and has two interrelated goals. The first is to develop students’ critical engagement with art, architecture, and material culture. The second goal is to explore the historiography and methodologies that shape art historical inquiry, including formalist, feminist, Marxist, Foucaultian, and contemporary critical theories. Organized around several major topics that have informed the ways in which art is created and interpreted, such as form, narrative, representation, and authorship, the class also provides an opportunity for specific applications of various methodological approaches through visual analyses of individual artworks. This course offers a foundation from which students can discuss and critically analyze art and visual culture as well as broader cultural movements and historical debates. Seminar format, readings, and discussion. Prerequisite is one of the following: ARTH 100, and one additional ARTH course, or consent of instructor

ART STUDIO COURSES (ART)

ART 105. Introduction to Visual Thinking (4E)

This topics-based course serves as a broad introduction to the visual arts through an investigation of 2D, 3D, and 4D (time-based and sequential) artistic practices. The topic of each course, developed by the instructor, serves as the framework to explore the creative process. Emphasis is placed on problem solving, problem generation, and the development of ideas in visual art making. Studio projects, critiques, and discussions incorporate reading, research, and writing components that integrate critical thinking with personal expression while encouraging the development of conceptual and formal skills. This course satisfies the Core Curriculum requirement in Arts.

ART 204. Introduction to Drawing (4E)

An introduction to the fundamental issues, materials, and techniques of drawing. Drawing skills and visual awareness are addressed through formal exercises and creative projects. Emphasis is given to developing an understanding of the basic principles of two-dimensional design and the depiction of form and space. This course satisfies the Core Curriculum requirement in Arts.

ART 206. Introduction to Painting (4F)

An introduction to the principles of painting and basic oil painting methods. Formal and expressive problems are explored through creative projects featuring a variety of techniques and subjects. Critiques and discussions of issues in art history and in contemporary art. This course satisfies the Core Curriculum requirement in Arts.

ART 208. Introduction to Sculpture (4F)

An introduction to the principles of sculpture and basic sculptural processes. Creative problems are explored through the use of a variety of subjects and techniques, including modeling and construction in clay, steel, and wood. Critiques and discussions of issues in art history and in contemporary art. This course satisfies the Core Curriculum requirement in Arts.

ART 212. Introduction to Photography (4E)

An introduction to the principles of photography and basic photographic processes. Creative problems are explored through the use of a variety of subjects and techniques, including experiments with paper and film, small-camera operation, roll-film processing, enlarging, finishing, and mounting. Critiques and discussions of issues in art history and contemporary art. This course satisfies the Core Curriculum requirement in Arts.

ART 214. Introduction to Digital Media Art (4E)

An introduction to the fundamental issues, tools and techniques of digital art. Formal and creative problems are explored through the use of a variety of computer software and hardware, including screen, audio and physical media projects. Critiques of digital art and discussion of issues in contemporary digital media. This course satisfies the Core Curriculum requirement in Arts.  

ART 304. Advanced Drawing (4F)

An intensive studio practice in drawing. Emphasis is given to developing an understanding of the unique issues and concerns of drawing and how these may contribute to the expression of a personal vision. Projects are directed to develop the student’s ability to work independently. Studio projects, critiques, and discussions of issues in art history and contemporary art. This course may be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: ART 204.

ART 306. Advanced Painting (4AS)

An intensive studio practice in painting. Emphasis is given to developing an understanding of the unique issues and concerns of painting and how these may contribute to the expression of a personal vision. Projects are directed to develop the student’s ability to work independently. Studio projects, critiques, and discussions of issues in art history and contemporary art. This course may be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: ART 206.

ART 308. Advanced Sculpture (4A)

An intensive studio practice in sculpture. Emphasis is given to the issues and concerns of sculpture and to the resolution of an artistic conception through all of the stages of the creative process, from designing models to fabricating finished works. Projects are directed to develop the student’s ability to work independently. Studio projects, critiques, and discussions of issues in art history and contemporary art. This course may be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite is one of the following: ART 105 or ART 208.

ART 309. Advanced Drawing + Printmaking (4S)

An intensive studio practice that explores the intersections between direct drawing techniques and indirect drawing as practiced in printmaking. Emphasis is given to skill building in both drawing and printmaking as this serves to expand the materials and techniques, processes, and conceptual approaches employed by artists to create 2D art works. Projects are directed to develop the student’s ability to work independently and explore subject matter drawn from observation and imagination in color and black and white media. Instruction provided in drawing using wet and dry media, the printmaking processes of drypoint, relief and monotype, and basic construction of books. Lecture and discussion, writing and research, studio projects and critiques. This course may be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: ART 204 or permission of the instructor.

ART 312. Advanced Photography (4A)

An intensive studio practice in photography. Emphasis is given to the issues and concerns of photography and how these may contribute to the realization of the student’s personal vision. Projects are directed to develop the student’s ability to work independently. Studio projects, critiques, and discussions of issues in art history and contemporary art. This course may be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: ART 212.

ART 314. Advanced Digital Art (4S)

An intensive studio practice in digital and time-based art (digital video, computer animation and web-based applications). Emphasis is given to developing an understanding of the unique issues and concerns of digital and time-based art and how these may contribute to the expression of a personal vision. Projects are designed to develop the student’s ability to work independently. Studio projects, critiques, and discussions of issues in art history and contemporary art. This course may be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: ART 214.

ART 485. Practicum in Art Studio Instruction (2E)

Supervised experience in organizing, preparing, and teaching a studio art course and supervising studio lab sessions. Students are assigned to a specific art studio course and will assist the instructor. Grade evaluation will be based on attendance, preparation, teaching ability and specific tasks assigned by the instructor, such as designing a demonstration or presentation to illustrate art studio principles and practices. This course may be repeated once for credit. Prerequisites: students must be art majors and/or must obtain consent of the instructor.

ART 493. St. Mary’s Project in Studio Art I (4F)

This course provides a structured environment in which students explore and develop their own artistic interests in the context of exchange with fellow seminar members and a faculty mentor. In a selected area of focus (drawing, painting, photography, printmaking, sculpture, or combined media), students pursue sustained independent studio projects accompanied by written formulation of artistic concerns and research into related art and ideas. Consult the Department of Art and Art History’s guidelines for the St. Mary’s Project. Prerequisite: one 300-level studio art course in the student’s chosen area of focus and the approval of the instructor and chair of the Art and Art History Department.

ART 494. St. Mary’s Project in Studio Art II (4S)

In this course students continue to develop and produce a body of self-generated studio work culminating in a public exhibition. This exhibition will be accompanied by a written statement of goals placed within an art historical context and a public lecture that addresses the project’s expressive significance and its relationship to contemporary art and art theory. Consult the Department of Art and Art History’s guidelines for the St. Mary’s Project. This course replaces ART 490. Prerequisite: one 300-level studio art course in the student’s chosen area of focus selected from the following; ART 304 Drawing Studio; ART 306 Painting Studio; ART 308 Sculpture Studio; ART 312 Photography Studio; ART 314 Digital and Time-based Studio; and the approval of the instructor and chair of the Art and Art History Department.

ART 398, 498. Off-Campus Internship (4-16E)

Off-campus experiential learning opportunity. A variety of internships can be arranged through the Career Development Center, subject to the approval of the art faculty. The off-campus internship is an individually designed experience that allows the student to explore the relationship between learning and everyday work situations. Prerequisites: admission to the Internship Program and approval of the department chair. (See “Internships” under “Academic Policies” section.) Credit/no credit grading.

ART 199, 299, 399, 499. Independent Study (1-4E)

This course consists of an independent creative or research project designed by the student and supervised by an art faculty member. The nature of the project, the schedule for accomplishment, and the means of evaluation must be formalized in a learning contract prior to registration. (See “Independent Study” under “Academic Policies” section.)

TOPICS IN STUDIO ART AND ADVANCED TOPICS IN STUDIO ART

One of the following courses will be offered each year:

ART 233. Topics in Studio Art (4)

Various topics presented as introductory-level courses, each focusing on a particular studio art activity. Topics may be defined in terms of techniques, medium, or subject matter. This course may be repeated for credit if the topic is not repetitive. For a description of each course, see the current online “Schedule of Classes.” This course satisfies the Core Curriculum requirement in Arts.

ART 333. Advanced Topics in Studio Art (4)

Various topics presented as advanced-level courses, each focusing in depth on a particular issue in studio art. Topics may be defined in terms of technique, medium, or subject matter. These courses are designed for students who have already completed introductory-level work in the area of each topic offering. This course may be repeated if the topic is not repetitive. For a description of each course and its prerequisites, see the current online “Schedule of Classes.”

ART 339. Advanced Topics in Studio Art: Painting and Drawing from Life (4)

The principles, practices, and history of painting and drawing from direct observation. Students learn advanced techniques of drawing and painting from direct observation and the conceptual framework for a variety of approaches to life painting and drawing. Studio work from the model, still life, and landscape. Critique and discussion of traditional and contemporary observational drawing and painting. Prerequisite: one of the following art studio courses: ART 100, 102, 105, 204, 206, 208, 210, 212, 233, 333, or consent of instructor.

ART 347. Advanced Topics in Studio Art: Book Arts (4)

This course explores the art of the book. Emphasis is placed on the book as a communicative medium, the interrelationships between text and image, and the creation of sequence, narrative, and meaning through visual and textual means. Students will develop original content and design for book projects, and are encouraged to explore their own poetry, prose, artwork and other subject matter of interest. Students learn basic bookbinding, typography and layout skills, relief and intaglio printmaking, and digital imaging. Directed and self-proposed projects, critiques and discussion of traditional and contemporary art. Prerequisite: one of the following art studio courses: ART 100, 102, 105, 204, 206, 208, 210, 212 or consent of instructor. Previous experience with digital imaging is encouraged.

ART 338. Advanced Topics in Studio Art: Figure Sculpture (4AF)

This course focuses on creating sculpture from direct observation of the human figure. Class activities include both drawing and sculpting from anatomical aids and live models. Students learn how to create portrait busts and full figure sculptures in clay. Other class activities include group critiques and research of traditional and contemporary approaches to figurative sculpture. Formerly ART 333: Figure Sculpture. Not open to students who have received credit for ART 333. Prerequisite: one of the following art studio courses: ART 204, 206, 208 or consent of instructor.

ART 390. Advanced Topics in Studio Art: The Artist Naturalist (4S))

This course explores the world of nature from the perspective of the artist naturalist in history and in studio practice. Key figures such as Aristotle, Pliny, Robert Hooke, John James Audubon, Mark Catesby, Ernst Haeckel, Maria Sybilla Merian, and Charles Darwin provide examples of the diverse approaches to documenting and studying the natural world. In studio projects students learn drawing and painting techniques that have direct applications to illustration including the use of pencil, pen and ink, and watercolor painting. Throughout the semester each student keeps a nature journal of writing and art. Lecture and discussion, writing and research, studio projects and fieldwork. This course satisfies an Environmental Studies Area requirement.