Spanish Courses (ILCS)

ILCS 101. Elementary Spanish I (4E)

An introduction to the basic structures of spoken and written Spanish and an introduction to Hispanic cultures as expressed in language and other cultural forms. This course is for students beginning the study of Spanish. Each section of ILCS 101 focuses on a specific culture topic.

ILCS 102. Elementary Spanish II (4E)

A continuation of the study of basic grammar and Hispanic cultures begun in ILCS 101, with further attention to communicative goals. Each section of ILCS 102 focuses on a specific cultural topic. This course satisfies the Core Curriculum requirement in Cultural Perspectives if not used to satisfy the Core Curriculum International Language requirement. Prerequisite: ILCS 101 or equivalent as determined by the Foreign Language Proficiency Test.

ILCS 110. Accelerated Elementary Spanish (4E)

An accelerated study of the communicative and cultural material presented in ILCS 101 and ILCS 102. Designed for students who have some prior knowledge of Spanish. Each section of ILCS 110 focuses on a specific cultural topic. Prerequisite: Admission determined by Foreign Language Proficiency Test.

ILCS 201. Intermediate Spanish I (4E)

This course is the first half of the intermediate level sequence in Spanish language. Students will do a thorough review of all grammatical structures studied in the first year of Spanish. Students will also build on this foundation by studying additional grammatical structures. Emphasis will be given to developing proficiency in the use of the past tense and in developing a working use of the subjunctive mood. In addition, students will work to develop reading and writing skills through short compositions and a cultural project that requires the reading of current media from Spain and Latin America. Particular attention will also be paid to social and historical contexts of Spanish speaking countries. Class participation will also be strongly emphasized. This course satisfies the Core Curriculum requirement in Cultural Perspectives if not used to satisfy the Core Curriculum International Language requirement. Prerequisites: ILCS 102 or 110 or equivalent as determined by the Foreign Language Proficiency Test.

ILCS 202. Intermediate Spanish II (4E)

This course is the second half of the intermediate level sequence in Spanish language. Students will continue to work towards mastering all grammatical structures in the indicative mood and will deepen their proficiency in the subjunctive. The continued development of reading and writing skills will also be emphasized with the incorporation of a major reading and research project. Class participation will continue to be strongly emphasized. This course satisfies the Core Curriculum requirement in Cultural Perspectives if not used to satisfy the Core Curriculum International Language requirement. Prerequisite: ILCS 201 or equivalent as determined by the Foreign Language Proficiency Test.

ILCS 206. Introduction to Literature in Spanish (4E)

Students will study short literary texts representing several periods and genres. Particular attention will be paid to the social and historical context of the literature. Grammar will be reviewed only as needed. Written assignments will be based primarily on readings. This course satisfies the Core Curriculum requirement in Cultural Perspectives if not used to satisfy the Core Curriculum International Language requirement. Prerequisite: ILCS 202 or equivalent as determined by the Foreign Language Proficiency Test.

ILCS 300. ICADS Semester (16E)

This semester-long course allows students to develop their Spanish language skills and to gain a deep understanding of the Central American region through study at the Institute for Central American Development Studies (ICADS). The ICADS focuses on women’s issues, economic development, environmental studies, public health, education, human rights, and wildlife conservation. Students can choose to participate in one of two tracks. One is the ICADS Semester Internship and Research Program, where after a four-week language and culture orientation students spend eight weeks on an independent project in Costa Rica or Nicaragua, followed by a final two weeks at ICADS to present the students’ experience. The internship can be with one of many types of organizations. The second track is the Field Course in Resource Management and Sustainable Development, where after a four-week language and culture orientation students spend five weeks in small groups in three to four different areas within Costa Rica where they learn about a diversity of ecological zones and systems of regional development. The second track concludes with a five-week independent study in one of the previously visited locations, chosen by the student, and a final presentation. For more information on ICADS, go to the web site: www.icads.org. To apply for the program, contact a Spanish professor in the Department of International Languages and Cultures. The awarding of the full 16 credits is dependent upon successful completion of all components of the ICADS semester. Prerequisites: ILCS 102 or 110, or any higher level ILCS course, and permission of the ICADS faculty liaison in the Department of International Languages and Cultures.

ILCS 360. Advanced Writing Workshop (4)

Close study of grammatical and stylistic structures as they apply to various writing assignments, including translations between English and Spanish. Writing assignments, grammar review, and discussions in a workshop format will provide the methodology for developing each student’s self-expression in Spanish, and for improving mastery of grammar and composition. As a final project, students will produce a publication of their work. Prerequisite: ILCS 206 or consent of the instructor.

ILCS 361. Indigenous Cultures in Latin America (4)

Indigenous cultures in Latin America began to develop a rich tradition as early as two thousand years before the Christian era. These traditions led to the rise of highly complex civilizations. In certain places of Latin America, such as Guatemala, southern Mexico, and the Andean region of South America, indigenous cultures are still extant. In this course we will explore both the current realities of indigenous cultures in parts of Latin America, as well as pre-Columbian and colonial antecedents. The content of the course will vary, sometimes focusing more on historical background and at other times on contemporary conditions; at times the course may focus on a single indigenous tradition, and at others may provide a more panoramic perspective. Readings will be in Spanish. May be repeated for credit with permission of the instructor. Prerequisite: ILCS 206 or consent of the instructor.

ILCS 362. African Diaspora Cultural Expressions in Latin America (4)

This course explores the myriad historical, cultural, and artistic contributions of African culture(s) in the Diaspora to the formation of the Hispanic world — including Spain, the American mainland, and the Caribbean. May be repeated for credit with permission of the instructor. Prerequisite: ILCS 206 or consent of the instructor.

ILCS 363. Cultural Perspectives on Gender (4)

This course focuses on cultural constructions of gender as they are represented in literature, art, film, and /or social movements. Special attention will be given to individual and collective strategies to redefine traditional cultural values related to gender. We will also consider how the relationships among gender, race, and social class affect who produces national discourse and how. Artistic and social expression from different historical periods in Spanish, Latin American, and/or Latino/a cultures will be the basis of our discussions. May be repeated for credit with permission of the instructor. Prerequisite: ILCS 206 or consent of the instructor.

ILCS 365. Creating for Social Change (4)

Historically, as well as today, there is a link between cultural production and the commitment to address social concerns in both Latin America and Spain. This course explores the ethical and aesthetic aspects of texts which have as their obvious aim the promotion of social change within the societies where they were produced. May be repeated for credit with permission of the instructor. Prerequisite: ILCS 206 or the consent of the instructor.

ILCS 368. The Construction of Nationalism and Cultural Identity (4)

This course examines the topic of nationalism as it has emerged in Latin America from the independence wars to the present. Special consideration will be given to historical, social, and political conditions that gave rise to particular national discourses, particularly in relation to race, class, gender, anti-colonialism, revolution, and globalization. Prerequisite: ILCS 206 or consent of the instructor.

ILCS 369. The Problematic of Modernity (4)

The concept of modernity is associated with the impact of the Industrial Revolution on society, and all the attendant transformations and dislocations that this revolutionary mode of production brought about. In the Spanish-speaking world, modernity was experienced as a crisis of identity due to the highly uneven social and economic development that was characteristic of Spanish-speaking societies. This course examines the many manifestations of this identity crisis in writings and/or other creative expressions produced during the 19th and 20th centuries. May be repeated for credit with permission of the instructor. Prerequisite: ILCS 206 or consent of the instructor.

ILCS 370. Postmodernity and Globalization (4)

Postmodernity is a much-debated and ambiguously defined term that attempts to describe historical and cultural developments since the 1970s. It dovetails with the concept of globalization, which first described economic developments and has now broadened to encompass ideas about cultural phenomena. The decades since the 1970s have produced often divergent socio-political experiences and artistic expressions in Spain and Latin America, but for both regions this period has meant a re-evaluation of popular cultures, of political participation, and of regional and national identities by many writers, artists, and activists. In Latin America this re-evaluation sometimes emerged in response to dictatorship, civil war, neo-liberal policies; in Spain it emerged as the return to democracy after 36 years of conservative dictatorship created a radical shift in popular and artistic expression. This course explores postmodernity and globalization from Spanish and/or Latin American perspectives through literature and other arts in the context of these socio-political changes since the late 20th century. Prerequisite: ILCS 206 or consent of the instructor.

ILCS 372. Multicultural Characteristics of Early Modern Spain (4)

This course examines the social, economic, cultural, and artistic evolution of the Iberian Peninsula from the Muslim invasion in the 8th century to the beginning of the Spanish Empire’s decline in the 17th century. Selected works will be examined as manifestations, critiques and defenses of the political, social, cultural characteristics of Spain’s development into the world’s most powerful empire. Special attention will be given to the influence various cultures within the Peninsula, as well as Spain’s contact with its colonies, had on the formation of its identity as a modern state. Prerequisite: ILCS 206 or consent of the instructor.

ILCS 440. Special Topics in Hispanic Studies (4AS)

Advanced study of a topic, theme, problem, or major figure in Hispanic literature or culture. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: Two 300-level ILCS courses or consent of the instructor.

ILCS 493/494. St. Mary’s Project (1-8E)

A student-initiated and student-executed project of eight credit hours is the senior capstone experience, to be carried out in Spanish. Depending on the nature of the project, some components may be written in English, with the approval of the mentor. The project may be a research project in literary or cultural studies, a creative-expressive project involving the arts, or a pedagogical project involving teaching applications. Also, depending on the focus of the student’s course work and interests, the project can be single or multi-disciplinary based. Whatever the nature of the project, students must demonstrate in it: 1) linguistic competence equal to the task; 2) a method of approach and execution appropriate to the task; 3) adequate knowledge of the particular area of research or endeavor; 4) an ability to analyze and reflect upon this knowledge in order to integrate it with knowledge in other areas of inquiry or performance; and 5) the readiness to critically discuss and publicly share the results of the project. Prerequisites: ILCT 393; approval of a faculty project mentor; approval of the department chair. NOTE: Students whose projects are to be based on material collected “in the field” while studying abroad during their junior year or while engaged in off-campus apprenticeships or internships should discuss their plans with a faculty adviser as early as the second semester of their sophomore year. This course is repeatable for up to a total of eight credit hours.

ILCS 199, 299, 399, 499. Independent Study (1-4E)

This course consists of an independent creative or research project designed by the student and supervised by a foreign language faculty member. The nature of the project, the schedule for accomplishment, and the means of evaluation must be formalized in a learning contract prior to registration. (See “Independent Study” under “Academic Policies” section.)