St. Mary's College of Maryland

August 1, 2010-July 31, 2011

A - B

Christine Adams, professor of history, presented “‘Aucun être humain n’était sorti si beau des mains du Créatur’:  Madame Tallien and the Moral and Political Power of Beauty” at the annual meeting of the Society for French Historical Studies, Charleston, South Carolina.

Sybol Cook Anderson, associate professor of philosophy, co-authored with Brian O’Sullivan, assistant professor of English, Lenny Howard, assistant vice president for academic services, and Linda Coughlin, associate dean of faculty, a successful grant proposal for $75,000 from the Maryland Higher Education Commission’s Maryland College Access Challenge Grant to expand the DeSousa-Brent Scholars Program from a one-year to a four-year sequence.

Katy Arnett, associate professor of educational studies, co-authored with Lois Stover, professor of educational studies, Angela Johnson, associate professor of educational studies, and Lin Muilenburg, assistant professor of educational studies, “Combating Symbolic Violence in Public Schools:  Federal Education Policy Must Aim at a Different Target” in The Journal for Peace and Justice Studies. She presented “Lesson Design for the Inclusive Second Language Classroom at the conference of the Canadian Association of Language Teachers, Montréal, Québec, Canada.

Aileen Bailey, associate professor of psychology, co-authored the following three presentations at the annual Society for Neuroscience meeting: “Investigating the Effects of Postnatal Exposure to Prozac on Adult Rat Motor and Emotional Behavior” with Kimberly Konka ‘10; “Investigation of Non-motor Related Behavioral and Cognitive Changes in an Environmentally-induced Model of Parkinsonism” with Larissa Fomum-Mugri ’10, and Kim McDowell and Paul Yarowsky from the University of Maryland School of Medicine; “Serotonin Mediated Potentiation in Area CA1: Altered in Depression and Crucial for Antidepressant Action” with Xiang Cai and Scott Thompson at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, and Angy Kallarackal ‘06 and Kaitlyn Gaylor ‘11.

José Ballesteros, associate professor of Spanish, gave an invited reading of some of his poems at the Library of Congress from the anthology, At the Foot of the White House: Hispanic Poets in Washington, D.C., to launch this year’s Teatro de La Luna’s Poetry Marathon. His poem, “Crepuscular,” was performed a cappella at Brandeis University by the New York Virtuoso Singers with music composed by Christian Gentry.

Leslie Bayers, assistant professor of Spanish, published the essay, "Performance and Polyphony in the Poetry of José María Arguedas," in the journal, Chasqui: Revista de literatura latinoamericana. She published an essay and annotations reviewing trends and notable publications in the field of Peruvian poetry in the Handbook of Latin American Studies, Vol. 66, University of Texas Press. Bayers presented the paper, "Reeling from Shock: Crisis and Response in Postwar Peruvian Cinema," at the XXIX Congress of the Latin American Studies Association in Toronto, Canada.

Barbara Beliveau, associate professor of economics, presented the following three posters on her teaching innovations in a session sponsored by the American Economic Association at the annual meeting of the Allied Social Science Associations in Denver, Colorado: “Do Voting Schemes Matter?”; “Financial Bubbles: Are YOU Smarter than Isaac Newton?”; and “Teaching Statistical Inference with Multiple Decks of Cards.”  She co-published with Eldon Bernstein and Hsin-Jing Hsieh of Lynn University, “Knowledge Management: Strategy, Enablers and Process Capability in U.S. Software Companies” in the Journal of Multidisciplinary Research.  With Louis Hicks, professor of sociology, and Ronald Stone, assistant director of the campus store, Beliveau co-published “Why College Students Sell Back Their Textbooks,” in the College Student Journal.  She was a proposal reviewer for the American Association of University Women International Grant Program and joined the editorial review board of the Journal of Multidisciplinary Research.

M. Fevzi Bilgin, assistant professor of political science, wrote Political Liberalism in Muslim Societies (Routledge, New York).  He presented a paper, “Who Will Guard the Guardians? The Troublesome Secularism of the Turkish Military,” at the conference on “Turkey at the Crossroads” at the University of South Florida.  Bilgin delivered talks on Turkish foreign policy at the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies and on Turkey and the Turkish Constitution at the Virginia State Assembly and on Capitol Hill.

Anne Marie Brady, associate professor of psychology, co-published with Ronald Saul '08 and Matthew Wiest '07, “Selective Deficits in Spatial Working Memory in the Neonatal Ventral Hippocampal Lesion Rat Model of Schizophrenia” in Neuropharmacology, Vol. 59, pp. 605-611. She presented the following posters at the Society for Neuroscience in Washington, D.C.: With Alex Hernandez '10, Elizabeth S. Smith '10, and Erin Cammarata '11, “Behavioral Abnormalities in the Neonatal Ventral Hippocampal Lesion Model of Schizophrenia Following Cocaine Self-Administration” and with Daniel Kircher '10, “An Investigation of the Behavioral Effects of Perinatal Bisphenol-A Exposure in Comparison to Disruptions Observed in Animal Models of Schizophrenia."  Brady presented with Julie E. Bernstein '11 the poster, "Developmental Exposure to Low Doses of Bisphenol-A: Sex-Dependent Behavioral Effects in Adult Offspring," at the annual meeting of the Organization for the Study of Sex Differences in Oklahoma City.  She served as faculty coordinator for the 5th annual Southern Maryland Brain Bee, an academic competition for local high school students.

Adriana Brodsky, associate professor of history, presented her work at several conferences: Association of Jewish Studies, American Historical Association, Society for the Study of Children and Youth, and Latin American Jewish Studies Association.  She was an invited participant in a workshop,  “Crossing Borders: New Approaches to Modern Judeo-Spanish (Sephardic),” organized by the UCLA Jewish Studies Program and the Maurice Amado Sephardic Studies Chair.  Brodsky was awarded a six-month Kluge Fellowship at the Library of Congress.  She continues as board member of the Latin American Jewish Studies Association and of the Journal of Jewish Identities

Jeffrey Byrd, Aldom-Plansoen Honors College Professor and professor of biology, and Samantha Elliott, assistant professor of biology, along with two students, presented the poster, “Microbial Diversity Based Upon Land Management Practices in Organic Farming: Effect on Bacteria-Nematode Associations,” at the national meetings of the American Society for Microbiology in New Orleans. They presented a talk, “Cyto-Mind Storming: Combining Classes to Explore the Interface Between Subjects Using Case Studies,” at the American Society for Microbiology Conference on Undergraduate Education.

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Michael Cain, professor of political science, received two awards for his sabbatical research:  a United States Embassy Policy Specialist award from IREX to provide consultations on energy to the U.S. embassy in Dushanbe, Tajikistan, and a teaching and research Fulbright award in the Department of Government and Public Administration at the University of Macau, Special Administrative Region (SAR) in China.

Elizabeth Charlebois, associate professor of English, published “‘Their Minds Transfigured So Together’:  Imaginative Transformation and Transcendence in A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” Chapter 16, in Performing New Lives: Prison Theatre, which focused on her work on the play with inmate actors at a women’s maximum security prison in Missouri as part of her sabbatical project as Scholar-in-Residence for Prison Performing Arts. 

Jennifer Cognard-Black, associate professor of English, was awarded a Fulbright Scholarship to teach two classes at the University of Ljubljana in Slovenia.  She published two essays on contemporary painters: Streamline:  Abstract Painters” and “Visual Play:  Five Contemporary Painters” for C2 Art Consulting in St. Petersburg, Florida, as well as a short story, “Gifts,” in Assembly Journal.  Cognard-Black gave an invited lecture at Otterbein University on “The (Im)possibility of Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies” and a presentation at the conference on “College Composition and Communication” in Atlanta, Georgia, on “Eat My Words:  Writing Self and Society Through Food.”  She was interviewed by Feminist Magazine about the intersections of feminism and food for a program called “Feminist Foodies” http://feministmagazine.org/2011/05/fm-may-18/.

Kenneth Cohen, assistant professor of history, published a peer-reviewed article, “Sport for Grown Children: American Political Cartoons and Sporting Culture, 1790-1850,” in the International Journal of the History of Sport. He commented in The Washington Post on the debate over replacing John Hanson with Harriet Tubman in the Capitol’s Statuary Hall. Cohen coached a local Special Olympics soccer team which represented the United States at the XIII Special Olympics World Summer Games in Athens, Greece, and came home with the country’s first-ever gold medal in soccer.

Jeffrey Coleman, associate professor of English, was awarded a Maryland Humanities Council grant of $7,000 for “The Other Side of September: Literary and Cinematic Representations of 9/11.”   He presented “There’s a Riot Goin’ On: The Poetry of Social Uprisings during the Civil Rights Era” during the “Literature and Politics III: Contemporary Poetry” session at the national Popular Culture and American Culture Associations Conference in San Antonio, where he also served as session chair for the panel.

Karen Crawford, professor of biology, continues to serve on the Scientific Board of the Indiana University Center for Regenerative Medicine as well as a member of the National Institutes of Child Health and Development study section.  She served as a co-director for the Joint Universities Summer Teaching Laboratory at the Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, Massachusetts.

Helen Daugherty, G. Thomas and Martha Meyers Yeager Chair in the Liberal Arts and professor of sociology, presented a paper, “Ndanka Ndanka: Assessing the Progress in The Gambia of the U.N. Millennium Goal 3 to Promote Gender Equality and Empower Women,” at the International Interdisciplinary Congress on Women in Ottawa, Canada.  It was based on the St Mary’s Projects of Lucy Bill ‘10 and Renee Angelo ’09, who co-authored the paper with her.

Asif Dowla, Hilda C. Landers Endowed Chair in the Liberal Arts and professor of economics, published a chapter on Higher Education and Microfinance in the Handbook of Microfinance, World Scientific Press. He gave keynote speeches in conferences organized by the Inter-American Development Bank in Montevideo, Uruguay, and by Forolacfr, a consortium of Microfinance Organizations of Mexico in Cancun during the Climate Change talks.  Dowla presented a paper on "Climate Change and Microfinance" at the 2nd European Research Conference on Microfinance in the Netherlands.

Faruk Eray Düzenli, assistant professor of economics, published the introduction for a symposium on Marxian value theory in Rethinking Marxism.  He presented a paper, “Labor in Development: Representations of Labor in International Institutions’ Discourses,” at the Eastern Economic Association’s annual meeting in New York, as part of a panel sponsored by the Association of Social Economics.

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Leah Eller, assistant professor of chemistry, served on a grant review panel for the Transforming Undergraduate Education in Science (TUES) Program in Chemistry at the invitation of the National Science Foundation (NSF).

Samantha Elliott, assistant professor of biology, co-authored with Lin Muilenburg, assistant professor of educational studies, Elizabeth Desy (Southwest Minnesota State University), Mary Durant (Lone Star College – North Harris), and Kelly McDonald (California State University, Sacramento), "Early Predictive Risk or Success Factors in Introductory Biology: Hallmarks for Intervention Strategies" presented at the Society for the Advancement of Biology Education Research national meeting. She published “Efficacy of Role Play in Concert with Lecture to Enhance Student Learning of Immunology” in the Journal of Microbiology and Biology Education and was featured in an interview on the National Science Foundation (NSF) funded Biology Scholars Program website about this work. Elliott co-published with Craig Sturgeon ‘08, Deborah Travers ‘10, and Madeline Montgomery ’12, “Mode of Bacterial Pathogenesis Determines Phenotype in elt-2 and elt-7 RNAi Caenorhabditis elegans” in Development and Comparative Immunology.  She gave a talk to the Chesapeake Bay Foundation’s K-12 Teacher Professional Development Program about Geocaching as an Educational Tool. 

Michael Ellis-Tolaydo, professor of theater, film and media studies, was nominated for the Outstanding Supporting Actor Helen Hayes Award for his performance as Mortera in David Ives’ play, New Jerusalem. He performed in the following roles:  Monsignor in Blake Robison's adaptation of Charming Billy by Alice McDermott at The Roundhouse Theatre; Birdboot in Tom Stoppard’s The Real Inspector Hound at Metro Stage; Avigdor in The Admission by Motti Lerner at the Theatre J New Play Reading Series; and Mourid Kamal in Vision 2 in Fever Chart: Visions of the Middle East by Naomi Wallace at the Forum Play Reading Series.  Ellis-Tolaydo also played various characters in Strangers in a Strange Land: The Lives of Jewish Immigrants compiled and directed by Derek Goldman for the Hyman S. & Freda Bernstein Jewish Literary Festival.  At the Dramatists Guild of America's 1st national conference he played as Henry in "different words for the same thing" by Kimber Lee for the Theatre of the First Amendment’s First Light 5X5 New Play Reading Series.  Ellis-Tolaydo was co-leader for the Shakespeare Teaches Teachers professional development workshop at the Brooklyn Academy of Music Education and Humanities Programs.  He served as faculty leader of the teacher-student Shakespeare workshop at the Folger Shakespeare Library and as adjudicator for the Folger Secondary School Shakespeare Festival sponsored by The Washington Post.

Ruth Feingold, associate dean of the core curriculum and academic advising and associate professor of English, gave presentations on representations of colonial girlhood in Australia at the annual conference of the Victorian Interdisciplinary Association of the Western United States and changing curricula and enrollment patterns in small college English departments at the Modern Language Association annual convention. With President Joseph Urgo, Dean of Faculty Larry Vote, and Dean of the Core Curriculum and First Year Experience Elizabeth Williams, she participated in a panel, “The Educational GPS: Navigating the Challenges of Going Global,” at the meeting of the American Association of Colleges and Universities. 

David Finkelman, professor of psychology, with Lois Stover, professor of educational studies, Ohio teacher C.J. Bott, and young adult author Jennifer Brown, presented “The Bully v. the Book:  What Teacher Educators Need to Know and be Able to Do”  at the National Council of Teachers of English conference.

Iris Ford, associate professor of anthropology, was awarded a $25,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities-Enduring Questions for “Does materialism enhance our humanity or compromise it?”

William Friebele, assistant professor of art, exhibited a solo show at the Civilian Art Projects Gallery in Washington, D.C. His work was written about twice in The Washington Post. His video, Traversing/Suburban, won the Best in Show award in the digital works exhibit at the Long Beach Island Foundation for the Arts and Sciences Gallery in New Jersey, curated by Christiane Paul, adjunct curator of New Media at the Whitney Museum. Friebele also exhibited at the “O, Miami Poetry Festival”; 10m2 Gallery in Sarajevo, Bosnia; and at the Martin Luther King Library in Washington, D.C.

David Froom, professor of music, orchestrated his chamber work, Amichai Songs, and wrote a major work for saxophone and piano, Turn of Events, published by American Composers Edition. His Sonata for Solo Violin was released on Parma Records and received an excellent review in the American Record Guide.  Froom’s music was performed on numerous occasions: "Saxophone Quartet" was played twice by the Manhattan Quartet at the 34th International Saxophone Symposium in Virginia and then in New Jersey; 2nd Piano Trio, Grenzen, was performed by the 21st Century Consort at the Smithsonian American Art Museum; Lightscapes for flute and piano was performed by Karen Johnson and Carlos Rodriguez, Piano Suite was performed by Eliza Garth and newly orchestrated Amichai Songs was performed with baritone William Sharp.  He participated in a set of architecture classes on the subject of aesthetics at Howard University.  Froom published an article, "Classical Music to Unite a Community," in the American Music Center's online magazine, New Music Box.  He was elected to the board of directors of the American Composers Alliance in New York City and continues to serve on the boards of the New York New Music Ensemble and the 21st Century Consort.

Jingqi Fu, associate professor of Chinese, co-authored with Lin Xu, Ling Duan, and Min Zhao, a paper, “Reading a Manuscript of Yunlong Bai Songs,” in Baizu Guwenxian, which made public an ancient text of Bai folksongs written in Chinese characters.

Katherine Gantz, associate professor of French, published an article, “Concrete Criticism:  Annotation and Transformation in Haussmannized Paris,” in the Rodopi anthology, Hexagonal Variations:  Diversity, Plurality, and Reinvention in Contemporary France.  She published an extended review of The Heroic City:  Paris 1945-1958 by Rosemary Wakeman and Paris from the Ground Up by James H. S. McGregor in the South Central Review.   Gantz presented the paper, “Color Schemes:  Mad Men’s Changing Palette of Working Women,” at the Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association of the South Conference.   An extended version of that article was published in Studies in Popular Culture.

Liza Gijanto, visiting instructor of anthropology, published “Exchange, Interaction, and Change in Local Ceramic Production in the Niumi Commercial Center on the Gambia River” in the Journal of Social Archaeology, Vol. 11, No. 1, pp. 21-48.  She was co-chair and session organizer with Akin Ogundiran of University of North Carolina-Charlotte of “Ceramics in the African Atlantic: New Perspectives on Social, Economic, Political, and Other Everyday Interactions” for the Historical Archaeology annual meeting in Austin, Texas, where she also presented a paper.

Laraine Glidden, Distinguished Professor of Psychology and Human Development, co-published a peer-reviewed article with Angie Draheim, department assistant in psychology, Joanne Kersh, a collaborator from University of Massachusetts, Boston, and a current student Lauren Bamberger, which was based, in part, on data collected at the SMCM sailing/kayaking regional games.  She chaired a symposium on Transition to Adulthood at the Gatlinburg Conference on Research in Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and presented a paper with four student co-authors.  Glidden was appointed a Global Scholar by Special Olympics International and was one of 14 invited speakers at a two-day working conference in Athens, Greece, held parallel to the Special Olympics World Games. She continued to serve on the executive councils of both the Academy on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and Division 33 of the American Psychological Association, including chairing the Fellows Committee.  Glidden reviewed grants for the National Institutes of Health (including a two-day session on human-animal interaction); served as a consultant for projects on early childhood intervention in India, transition to adulthood for persons with intellectual disability in New York City, and Special Olympics International; and was reappointed to the Board of Directors of the Arc of Southern Maryland.

Susan Goldstine, associate professor of math, displayed her mathematical art piece on topological map-coloring theorem, Tea for Eight, in the juried joint mathematics meetings exhibition of “Mathematical Art” in New Orleans.  She published a chapter, “Perfectly Simple: Squaring the Rectangle,” which gives a pattern for a representation in crochet of the smallest rectangle that can be divided into squares, no two of which are the same size, in A.K. Peters book on mathematical fiber arts, Crafting by Concepts.  Goldstine gave a talk, “Building a Better Bracelet:  Wallpaper Patterns in Bead Crochet,” at MathFest, the Mathematical Association of America’s annual meeting in Louisville, Kentucky.

Haomin Gong, assistant professor of Chinese and Asian studies, published the following: “Zhang Yimou” in the 2nd edition of Fifty Contemporary Film Directors, pp. 434-42, and “Popularization of Traditional Culture in Postsocialist China: A Study of the Yu Qiuyu Phenomenon” in the Journal of Contemporary China, Vol. 20, No. 69, pp. 343-58. He presented “The Ec(h)o between Iron and Litchi Trees: Migrant Poetry, Identity, and the Case of Zheng Xiaoqiong” at the 42nd annual convention of the Northeast Modern Languages Association (NeMLA) at Rutgers University and “Reframing the Ethnic Space, the Trick of Isomorphism: Producing a Socialist Universalism in Early Socialist China” at the Association for Asian Studies annual conference in Honolulu, Hawai’i.

Holly Gorton, professor of biology, was awarded a grant from the Lumina Foundation for $20,000 for “Course Redesign: Principles of Biology.” Samantha Elliott, assistant professor of biology and Lin Muilenburg, assistant professor of educational studies, were also involved in this project.

Susan Grogan, professor of political science, presented a paper, “The Role of Courts in Ameliorating Hard Times: Taking It Personally,” at the “The Politics of Hard Times: Citizens, Nations, and the International System under Economic Stress” panel during the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association.  She also chaired a panel at the meeting on LGBT issues and took part in the biennial meeting of the chapter advisors of Pi Sigma Alpha, the national political science honor society.

Joshua Grossman, assistant professor of physics, gave invited seminars on “Quantum Walks: Interference, Coherence, and Connectivity” at the University of Delaware, the College of William & Mary, and Dickinson College.  At the conference of the Division of Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics of the American Physical Society, he presented “Bichromatic Forces for Increasing the Number of Atoms in Miniaturized Traps” with co-authors Adam Hammett ’12, Rebecca Prasher ’12, Billy Malouf ’11, and Frank Narducci from the Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division of the Naval Air Systems Command.  Charles Adler, professor of physics, assisted with the question and answer portion.

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Linda Jones Hall, professor of history, presented a paper on Crispus, the son of Constantine who was killed by the famed emperor, at the “Shifting Frontiers in Late Antiquity” biennial international conference at Pennsylvania State University. She served on the board of directors for the Byzantine Studies Association of North America, which sponsors an annual international conference.

Jeffrey Hammond, George B. and Willma Reeves Distinguished Professor in the Liberal Arts and professor of English, published three short essays in Ohio Magazine:  “Storied Landscapes,” “The Pretender,” and “The Hunter-Gatherers of Findlay, Ohio.”  His essay on “My Father’s Hats” originally published in Shenandoah was reprinted in Pushcart Prize XXXV: Best of the Small Presses and also received a “Notable Essay” citation in Best American Essays 2010.   A paper, “Old Toys and New Play: Collecting as a Disruption of Nostalgia,” was accepted for a panel at the annual conference of the Society for the History of Childhood and Youth.

Louis Hicks, professor of sociology, Barbara Beliveau, associate professor of economics, and Ronald Stone, assistant director of the campus store, co-published “Why College Students Sell Back Their Textbooks,” in the College Student Journal. He was interviewed by Sheilah Kast on the “Maryland Morning” show on National Public Radio about the difficulties that judges and juries have with interpreting statistical evidence, especially from large datasets. 

Alan Jamieson, assistant professor of computer science, co-presented with Casey Douglas, assistant professor of mathematics, and H. Anna Han, assistant professor of psychology, “Measuring the Power of Jerks” on modeling a social psychology phenomenon at the 42nd Southeastern International Conference on Combinatorics, Graph Theory and Computing at Florida Atlantic University in Boca Raton.

Lindsay Jamieson, assistant professor of computer science, presented “Alliances on Graphs with more than 2 Sets of Vertices” at the 42nd Southeastern International Conference on Combinatorics, Graph Theory and Computing at Florida Atlantic University in Boca Raton, where she also served as a session chair.

Angela Johnson, associate professor of educational studies, published “Accomplishments and Challenges for Women in STEM:  Implications for Future Research and Programs,” as an invited commentary for a special issue of the Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering.  She co-authored with Heidi Carlone of University of North Carolina-Greensboro, Jaweer Brown of Planned Parenthood International, and Azita Cuevas of New York University School of Medicine, “Authoring Identity Amidst the Treacherous Terrain of Science:  A Multiracial Feminist Examination of the Journeys of Three Women of Color in Science” in the Journal of Research in Science Teaching.  Johnson co-authored with Lois Stover, professor of educational studies, Katy Arnett, associate professor of educational studies, and Lin Muilenburg, assistant professor of educational studies, “Combating Symbolic Violence in Public Schools:  Federal Education Policy Must Aim at a Different Target” in The Journal for Peace and Justice Studies. She continued as a member of the editorial board of the Journal of Research in Science Teaching and presented at the American Psychological Association annual meeting in San Diego, as well as the American Educational Research Association annual meeting in New Orleans.

Sue Johnson, professor of art, served as Visiting Scholar-in-Residence at the Centre for Medieval & Renaissance Studies, Oxford, England.  A one-person exhibition of her work, The Curious Nature of Objects, was held at the Pitt Rivers Museum, Oxford, to be followed by a second, larger exhibition of additional work opening at the museum and she was interviewed by BBC Radio Oxford about her project. Johnson was an invited guest speaker at the Rethinking Pitt-Rivers colloquium. Her work was included in several group exhibitions that include Novel Abstractions, Reyes + Davis, Washington, D.C.; Historical Prints - Fact and Fiction, Worcester Center for Crafts, Massachusetts; Earth, University of Baltimore, Maryland; Book as Document, University of West England, Bristol, England; and Monumental Ideas in Miniature Book II, organized by the University of Akron, Ohio, and traveling internationally.  She was awarded a residency fellowship by the Centre D’Art Marnay Art Centre (CAMAC) Marnay-sur-Seine, France, that included an award from the Tenot Foundation and was selected to be in-residence at the American Academy in Rome as a Visiting Artist.  Her work has been chosen for inclusion at numerous public collections (selected list):  Arts of the Book Collection/Yale University; U.S. Embassy in Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina; Museum of Modern Art/Franklin Furnace Archive; Smithsonian American Art Museum/Smithsonian Institution Libraries; Chelsea College of Art & Design, London; Joan Flasch Artists' Books Collection/School of the Art Institute of Chicago; University of California-Irvine; Rutgers University Libraries; Fleet Library/Rhode Island School of Design; Smith College Library, Rare Book Collection; Washington University in St. Louis Libraries; Gund Library; Cleveland Institute of Art; and University of Maryland University College. 

Julie King, associate professor of anthropology, received the President’s Award from the Register of Professional Archaeologists for her “outstanding advocacy of archaeology as a vital part of the nation’s historic preservation program” during her service on the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, which advises the President and the Congress.  She and Edward Chaney co-published a chapter in “Passing for Black in Seventeenth-Century Maryland” in Interpreting the Early Modern World, M. C. Beaudry and J. Symonds, editors.

Cynthia Koenig, associate professor of psychology, co-authored with Richard Griggs, a chapter, “Facilitation and Analogical Transfer on a Hypothetico-deductive Reasoning Task,” in The Science of Reason: A Festschrift for Jonathan St B.T. Evans published by Psychology Press.

Björn Krondorfer, professor of religious studies, published the following: two book chapters, “Männlichkeit und Selbstmitleid: Religiöse Rhetorik in Selbstzeugnissen von NS-Tätern” in Scham und Schuld, pp. 195-221 and “Interkulturelle Begegnungsprogramme zum Holocaust,” in Elemente einer zeitgemässen politischen Bildung, pp. 253-269; an essay, “Witnessing and Re-Imagining Through the Arts,” in CrossCurrents; and three book reviews in Studies in Christian-Jewish Relations and the Journal of Men, Masculinities and Spirituality.  He was the moderator of an international panel on “Disregard, Compassion, Forgiveness” that included panelists from Israel, South Africa, Palestine, the United Kingdom and the University of Würzburg, Germany. Krondorfer presented papers on issues of transitional justice, human rights, and reconciliation at the “Internationale Fachtagung” in Trier, Germany, and at the Turin University's Summer School Conference in Cuneo, Italy, and a paper “On Seminal Fluids and Confessional Discipline: Codes of Christian Masculinity in Late Antiquity” at the Symposium of the Canadian Initiative in Law, Culture & Humanities, Ottawa, Canada. Regional presentations included a talk at the Goethe Institute in Washington, D.C.; the Scholars and Core Program at Montgomery College; and the Jewish Federation of Howard County.  He responded to a critical review panel of his book Men and Masculinity in Christianity and Judaism at the American Academy of Religion, Atlanta, Georgia. Krondorfer led and facilitated a trilateral peace training seminar at Beit Jalah, Palestine, for a group of 50 Muslim Palestinians, Jewish Israelis, and German educators and students; and organized the visit of two Holocaust survivors for the “Global and International Studies” program at Leonardtown High School. He continued to be active on the advisory and editorial boards of the journals Religion and Gender (Netherlands), CrossCurrents (U.S.A.), theologie.geschichte (Germany), Textraum: Bibliodrama (Germany), and The Journal of Men, Masculinities and Spirituality (Australia), where he is also the book review editor. Krondorfer serves on the steering committee of the “Religion, Memory, History Consultation” at the American Academy of Religion, and is an active member of the European network Geschlechterbewusste Theologie and the Boston-based “Christian Scholars Group on Jewish-Christian Relations.”

David Kung, associate professor of mathematics, led a team of math and computer science faculty during the inaugural Emerging Scholars Program-Research Experience for Undergraduates (ESP-REU), a $265k National Science Foundation grant, which will continue bringing under-represented students to SMCM for a six-week intensive research program for two more years. He presented "Math and Social Justice: Improving the World with Semester Projects in a Liberal Arts Math Course" at the joint mathematics meetings in New Orleans.  Kung gave invited talks on mathematics and music at Phillips Exeter Academy, Villanova University, Slippery Rock University, the St. Lawrence River Valley Undergraduate Research Conference, and the annual conference of the Center for Undergraduate Research in Mathematics (CURM) at Brigham Young University.  

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Sterling Lambert, assistant professor of music, presented “Winter Words, Winter Journey: Schubert in Britten” at the 7th biennial “International Conference on Music Since 1900” at the University of Lancaster, United Kingdom.

Pamela Mann, assistant librarian, published the following three book reviews for Library Journal: Oil on Water by Helon Habila; In This Light: New and Selected Stories by Melanie Rae Thon; and Untold Story by Monica Ali.  She led a discussion at the American Library Association mid-winter meeting, “Digital Natives and the Myth of the Millennial Student,” which was included in the midwinter highlights issue of Cognotes, pg. 9 (http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/hall-erickson/alacognotes_sandiego_highlights201101/#/9.)

Pamela Mertz, associate professor of chemistry and biochemistry, presented the poster, “Student Presentations of Research Articles Integrated into a Biochemistry II Laboratory Course,” at the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology special symposium, “Student-Centered Education in the Molecular and Life Sciences II,” in Richmond, Virginia.  She co-presented with Michael Taber, assistant professor of philosophy, “Using the “Alumni Problem” to Solve the “Recruiting Problem” at the National Collegiate Honors Council (NCHC) conference in Kansas City, Missouri.  She served a third year on the Awards and Grants Committee for the NCHC.

David Morris, assistant professor of educational studies, co-published with Ellen Usher, “Developing Teaching Self-Efficacy in Research Institutions:  A Study of Award-Winning Professors” in Contemporary Educational Psychology, Vol. 36, No. 3, pp. 232-245.

Lin Muilenburg, assistant professor of educational studies, co-authored with Angela Johnson, associate professor of educational studies, Katy Arnett, associate professor of educational studies, and Lois Stover, professor of educational studies, “Combating Symbolic Violence in Public Schools:  Federal Education Policy Must Aim at a Different Target” in The Journal for Peace and Justice Studies. She co-authored with 2011 SMCM M.A.T. interns five papers published in the Proceedings of the Society for Information Technology and Teacher Education 2011 Conference: "Student Photoblogs Illustrating Real World Applications of Math and Science" with Katherine Bartz and Stacey Meyer; "Supporting Student Collaboration: Edmodo in the Classroom" with Catherine Holland; "Digital Storytelling in the Science Classroom: Using Analogies to Improve Understanding" with Christine Chadwick; "Mobile Phone Mystery" with Amanda Kerby and Elizabeth Vicini; and "Motivating Students to Read with Engaging eBooks" with Connie Cardwell. At the International Society for Technology in Education 2011 Conference, Muilenburg presented the hands-on session "Bring your own Cell Phone: Collaborative Activities for the Classroom" and a poster session with SMCM M.A.T. Laurel Matthew ‘11, "Lego-based Stop Action Movies as Constructionist Avenues to Learning." She co-authored with Samantha Elliott, assistant professor of biology, Elizabeth Desy (Southwest Minnesota State University), Mary Durant (Lone Star College – North Harris), and Kelly McDonald (California State University, Sacramento), "Early Predictive Risk or Success Factors in Introductory Biology: Hallmarks for Intervention Strategies" presented at the Society for the Advancement of Biology Education Research national meeting.

Charles Musgrove, assistant professor of history, presented a paper, “National Father & Pan-Asian Brother: The Sun Yatsen Mausoleum during the Japanese Occupation of Nanjing, 1937-1945,” at the Southeast Conference Association for Asian Studies, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

Rachel Myerowitz, professor of biology, co-published a paper, “Successful Enzyme Replacement Therapy in a Lysosomal Storage Disorder- Murin Pompe Disease” in Autophagy, Vol. 8, pp. 1078-1089.

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O - Q

Deborah O’Donnell, associate professor of psychology, co-presented with William Roberts, professor of anthropology, a paper, “Preliminary Findings from The Gambia Social and Health Assessment Survey (G-SAHA),” as part of the Applying Anthropology to Healthcare Problems: Lessons and Models” session at the annual meeting of the Society of Applied Anthropology in Seattle, Washington.  She published “The Gambia:  Indigenous Conceptualizations of Mental Illness,” an entry in the Encyclopedia of Cross-Cultural Psychology edited by Professor Kenneth Keith of the University of California-San Diego. O’Donnell served as a reviewer for a manuscript about impulse control and judgment for the journal, Developmental Psychology, published by the American Psychological Association and was an Educational Testing Service (ETS) grader for the Advanced Placement (AP) Psychology Exam. 

Brian O'Sullivan, assistant professor of English, published "'Crimes of Juxtaposition’: Incongruous Frames in Sullivan’s Travels” in KB Journal.  He co-published “Writing Centers Goes to Class: Peer Review [of our] Workshops” in Writing Lab Newsletter and “Instructor Ambivalence about Collaborative Assessment” in WPA: Writing Program Administration. O’Sullivan presented a paper, “The Ecology of the Waste Land: Negation and Social Change,” at the Kenneth Burke Society Conference, and it was named “Best Paper Overall.”

Brad Park, associate professor of philosophy, presented “Kokoro and Hara:  Cultivating Affective Cognition in Japanese Buddhism” at the Mike Ryan Lecture Series, Kennesaw State University, Atlanta, Georgia, and at Colby College, Maine.  He also presented “Embodied Ethics:  Engaging Asian Thought and Feminism with Erin McCarthy” at the 6th annual meeting of the Comparative and Continental Philosophy Circle in Cork, Ireland.

Carrie Patterson, associate professor of art, was a semi-finalist for the Feed Competition at 1708 Gallery in Richmond, Virgina.  Her work was included in the following exhibitions: Object and Field, AxD Gallery, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; New Walls Fresh Paint, The Painting Center, New York, New York; Streamline, C2 Fine Art in St. Petersburg, Florida; and the online scholarly resource, curatorial project, and international forum, Geoforms (www.geoforms.net). Her geometric objects, Signs, were poetic, physical translations of temporary billboards located in St. Mary’s County.

Jordan Price, associate professor of biology, co-published peer-reviewed papers in the following: “Where have all the trees gone? The Declining use of Phylogenies in Animal Behavior Studies,” with Mary Clapp '09 and Kevin Omland from the University of Maryland Baltimore County in the journal, Animal Behaviour, Vol. 81, pp. 667-670, and “Song-type Matching and Repertoire Sharing in a Bird With Very Large Song Repertoires, the Tropical Mockingbird” with David Yuan '06 in Behaviour, Vol. 148, pp. 673-689.  He gave invited scientific presentations at the University of Windsor in Ontario, Canada, Indiana University, and Villanova University and presented his research at the Animal Behavior Society meeting at Indiana University.  Jordan served as a grant proposal reviewer for the National Science Foundation and for the American Ornithologists’ Union.  He received his fifth Research Opportunity Award from the National Science Foundation to fund continuing research on vocal evolution in the New World blackbirds.

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R

Celia Rabinowitz, director of the library, was elected vice-chair/chair-elect of the college libraries section of the Association of College & Research Libraries, which serves over 2,000 members.  In this position she created a program planning committee that submitted a successful section chair proposal for the annual American Library Association conference, “Reference Resurrected: Models for the 21st-Century College Library.”

John Ramcharitar, assistant professor of biology, co-published with Gordon Michael Selckman ‘10, “Differential Ablation of Sensory Receptors Underlies Ototoxin-Induced Shifts in Auditory Thresholds of the Goldfish (Carassius auratus)” in the Journal of Applied Toxicology, Vol. 30, No. 6, pp. 536-541, and with Cody L. Brack ’11, “Physiological Dimensions of Ototoxic Responses in a Model Fish Species” in the Journal of Clinical Neuroscience, Vol. 17, pp.103-106, and “Assessment of Lateral Line Function: A Potential Technique for Studies in Ototoxicity” in the Journal of Clinical Neuroscience, DOI: 10.1016/j.jocn.2011.06.008. He co-presented with Cody Brack, Diana Roman ’12, and Caira Cartwright ‘13, “Ototoxin-Induced Changes in the Zebrafish (Danio rerio) Auditory System” at the Society for Neuroscience meeting in San Diego, California.

Donna Richardson, professor of English, presented the paper, “A Man With a Cross:  James Fenimore Cooper’s Romantic Revision of Milton in The Last of the Mohicans,” at the biennial State University of New York-Oneonta Cooper conference.

William Roberts, professor of anthropology, co-presented with Deborah O’Donnell, associate professor of psychology, a paper, “Preliminary Findings from The Gambia Social and Health Assessment Survey (G-SAHA),” as part of the Applying Anthropology to Healthcare Problems: Lessons and Models” session at the annual meeting of the Society of Applied Anthropology in Seattle, Washington.  With Jeanne Simonelli of Wake Forest University, he was appointed co-editor of the journal, Culture, Agriculture, Food and Environment, CAFÉ, new name for the journal published by the Culture and Agriculture section of the American Anthropological Association. Roberts was appointed program chair for the annual meeting of the Society for Applied Anthropology.

Israel Ruiz, associate professor of Spanish, published a selection of his poetry in the anthology, Poesía de Puerto Rico, Cinco Décadas (1950-2000), Selección de Reinaldo Marcos Padua et al, Caracas, Venezuela, Colección El perro y la rana, pp. 357-364.

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S - V

John Schroeder, associate professor of philosophy, published “Truth, Deception, and Skillful Means in the Lotus Sūtra” in Asian Philosophy, Vol. 21, No. 1, and “Nāgārjuna and the Philosophy of Upāya” in Buddhist Studies, Mahayana Buddhist Texts Series, editor V. Pannyavaro.

Sahar Shafqat, associate professor of political science, presented a paper, “Islamism and the Lawyers’ Movement in Pakistan,” at the Global Islam and South Asian Connections workshop at the Ali Vural Ak Center for Global Islamic Studies.  She was invited to join the advisory board of the Trust for Conservation of Coastal Resources (TCCR), a research think-tank that has been set up by members of the fisherfolk community in Pakistan to provide knowledge production that enables the community to empower itself.  Shafqat made a number of media appearances, including on WYPR radio in Baltimore in response to the raid to kill Osama Bin Laden. She was nominated to serve on the Committee on the Status of Lesbians and Gays in the Profession of the American Political Science Association.

Lois Stover, professor of educational studies, co-authored with Angela Johnson, associate professor of educational studies, Katy Arnett, associate professor of educational studies, and Lin Muilenburg, assistant professor of educational studies, “Combating Symbolic Violence in Public Schools:  Federal Education Policy Must Aim at a Different Target” in The Journal for Peace and Justice Studies. She co-published with Connie Zitlow of Ohio Wesleyan, “Portrait of the Artist as a Young Adult:  Who is the Real me?” in The ALAN Review. With David Finkelman, professor of psychology, Ohio teacher CJ Bott, and young adult author Jennifer Brown, Stover presented “The Bully v. the Book:  What Teacher Educators Need to Know and be Able to Do”  at the National Council of Teachers of English conference.  She continues to serve on the board of examiners for the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education, for which she conducts at least two accreditation visits each year.  

Michael Taber, assistant professor of philosophy, co-presented with Pamela Mertz, associate professor of chemistry and biochemistry, “Using the “Alumni Problem” to Solve the “Recruiting Problem” at the National Collegiate Honors Council (NCHC) conference in Kansas City, Missouri. 

Christopher Tanner, professor of biology, was a co-author on the following poster presentations: “The Effects of Wave Energy on the Epiphytes Growing on Eelgrass and Artificial Seagrass” at the fall meeting of the Atlantic Estuarine Research Society (AERS) with Rebecca Wright ‘10, Paula Riner ’12, and Charlotte Robinson ’11, and “Are Salicylic Acid and Hydrogen Peroxide Involved in Zostera marina Defense Against Wasting Disease?” with Amanda Liebrecht ‘11 at the spring Atlantic Estaurine Research Society meeting in Solomons, Maryland, where he served as co-host.

Merideth Taylor, professor of theater and dance, wrote a successful grant proposal for the Institute for Museum and Library Services Museums for America program, which enabled Historic Sotterley Plantation to undertake a $70,000 reinterpretation project in partnership with St. Mary’s College.  In addition to creating a short film on the history of the site, she served as grant project director for the year-long project.

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W - Z

Elizabeth Nutt Williams, Dean of the Core Curriculum and First Year Experience and associate professor of psychology, began her term as president of the division of psychotherapy of the American Psychological Association (APA) and continued in her role as past chair of the section for the Advancement of Women of the Society of Counseling Psychology.  She published two chapters in the book, Consensual Qualitative Research: A Practical Resource for Investigating Social Science Phenomena, published by the APA. Williams presented a paper at the annual convention of the APA. With President Joseph Urgo, Dean of Faculty Larry Vote, and Assistant Dean Ruth Feingold, she participated in a panel, “The Educational GPS: Navigating the Challenges of Going Global,” at the meeting of the American Association of Colleges and Universities. 

Jia Xu, assistant professor of economics, co-published with Mohsen Bahmani-Oskooee, “The S-Curve Dynamics of U.S.-Hong Kong Commodity Trade” in the Global Economic Review, Vol. 39, pp. 117-128.  She presented “Exchange Rate Volatility and Commodity Trade between U.S. and Hong Kong: Is There Third-Economy Effect?” at the Eastern Economics Association conference in New York and “Renminbi Depreciations and China-Japan Commodity Trade: Do Manufactured Goods Show Stronger Support for the S-Curve?” at the International Economic Association 16th World Congress in Beijing, China.

Michael Ye, associate professor of economics, co-published with John Zyren, Thomas Lee, and Joanne Shore, “Crude Oil Futures as a Market Change Indicator: A Graphical Analysis,” in the refereed journal,  International Advances in Economic Research, Vol. 16, No. 3.  He presented the paper, “Has Gasoline Price Pass-through Speed Increased?”, and served as discussant at the taxing and pricing session and the chair of the monetary issues section at the 70th International Atlantic Economic Conference in Charleston, South Carolina.  Ye served as the chair and discussant for “Fuel Demand and Supply” at the 75th Midwest Economics Association annual meeting in St. Louis, Missouri.


Aerial view of St. Mary's College of Maryland campus

St. Mary's College of Maryland
18952 E. Fisher Rd
St. Mary's City, MD 20686-3001
240-895-2000