Summer at St. Mary's

Jeff

Professor Jeffrey Silberschlag conducting the Chesapeake Orchestra at the River Concert Series.

Study abroad in Italy

Choir and Orchestra in Alba

You can participate in the Alba Music Festival, two weeks of intensive music making in the north of Italy.

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Larry Edward Vote

Professor, Choral Director

Larry Vote

An accomplished vocal soloist and conductor, Larry Vote has performed throughout the United States and Europe. As a member of The Tidewater Ensemble he has been heard on and conducted concerts in Weil Recital Hall at Carnegie Hall, The Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, The Baltimore Museum of Art and Jordan Hall in Boston, as well as on regional and national broadcasts of this group. A founding member of The Maryland Bach Aria Group, Mr. Vote may be heard in music of Bach, Handel and Telemann on two Compact Discs published by Crystal Records.

He has conducted or performed as baritone soloist in the premiers of works by Gian Carlo Menotti, William Thomas McKinley and David Froom among others. He recorded McKinley's Dallas, 1963 with the Slovak Radio Orchestra, which has been released on MMC Recordings. Hearing the Call, featuring new brass music conducted by Mr. Vote was released on Sonora records in September of 1999. Mr. Vote serves as resident musical director to Interact; a Washington D.C. based theater company. With Interact he has performed and directed productions for The National Gallery of Art, The Folger Shakespeare Library, The Landsburg Theater, Arena Stage, and in a tour of the United Kingdom.

The 1993 production of The Pirates of Penzance, for which he was Music Director and Conductor, won the award for Best Musical in the 1994 Helen Hayes Awards. He was nominated for Outstanding Musical Director for the production of H.M.S. Pinafore in 1996 and again in 2000 for Pirates of Penzance. He is also holder of the Norton Dodge Award for Creative and Scholarly Achievement presented by St. Mary's College of Maryland.

In his performance with Voices of the Golden Age, the Washington Post noted that "His reverberant reading of Bouvard's Le Temple de Bachus filled this aria with so much nobility and fervor that some real life thunderbolts outside seemed anticlimactic."