Seminars & Events

Thursday, September 11, 2014: Dr. Bevil Conway (Wellesley College) will speak on his research in visual neuroscience and color at 4:30 pm in Goodpaster Hall 195.

Monday, October 27, 2014: Dr. Todd Gould (University of Maryland Baltimore) will speak on "Genes to behaviors to treatments in bipolar disorder" at 4:45 pm in Goodpaster Hall 195

Friday, December 5, 2014:  Dr. Brian Mathur (University of Maryland Baltimore) will speak on "Braking bad: Aberrant inhibitory neurotransmission in addiction" at 3:00 pm in Goodpaster Hall 195.

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Alumni Highlight

Check out Jordan Gaines Lewis '11's award-winning blog, Gaines on Brains. 

gainesonbrains.com

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SMP Spotlight

Katie Gluskin and Jeff Haus present their SMP
Katie Gluskin and Jeff Haus, "Entorhinal Cortex Lesions, Habituation, and Latent Inhibition," 2013. Gluskin and Haus, the 2013 co-winners of the Neuroscience Award, infused a neurotoxin into the entorhinal cortex of rats to induce a lesion, and measured the resulting habituation and latent inhibition behavior within a fear conditioning paradigm.

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Wiest, Matthew (2007).  The Effects of Acute Exercise on a Dominant-Submissive Relationship in Rats.
Mentor: Dr. Anne Marie Brady

Abstract

A dominant submissive relationship (DSR) was established by pairing animals in the straight runway tube task (SRTT) and measuring their behavior for two weeks. Animals were exercised over a ten day testing period, during which DSR behavior was measured. After the treatment period, behavior was measured during social interaction and compared to before the animals were exercised. We were able to successfully establish a DSR by using the SRTT. Non-exercised pairs were measured for c-Fos and the DSR established in the SRTT was determined to differentially activate the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and not the amygdala between dominant and submissive animals. Even though some of the behaviors measured during social interaction were influenced by exercise, dominance behavior was not significantly altered by exercise during the SRTT or social interaction.